2012
DOI: 10.1002/jbmr.1856
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Use of DXA-based finite element analysis of the proximal femur in a longitudinal study of hip fracture

Abstract: Bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is used for clinical assessment of fracture risk; however, measurements that incorporate bone strength could improve predictive ability. The aim of this study was to determine whether bone strength derived from finite element (FE) analysis was associated with hip fracture risk in a longitudinal study. We studied 728 women (mean age 82 years), 182 with subsequent hip fracture. FE models were generated from baseline DXA scans of the hi… Show more

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Cited by 77 publications
(62 citation statements)
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References 41 publications
(66 reference statements)
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“…1(b)). Analysis was performed on the critical regions of interest (ROI) rather than the critical cross-sections, considering that a single-element failure does not indicate gross fracture of the whole bone [65]. This approach can also decrease the sensitivity of the results to the image processing algorithms [71].…”
Section: Calculation Of Impact Force and Hip Fracture Riskmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 3 more Smart Citations
“…1(b)). Analysis was performed on the critical regions of interest (ROI) rather than the critical cross-sections, considering that a single-element failure does not indicate gross fracture of the whole bone [65]. This approach can also decrease the sensitivity of the results to the image processing algorithms [71].…”
Section: Calculation Of Impact Force and Hip Fracture Riskmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…assuming the plane-stress approach, i.e., considering that proximal femur is a plate with a constant thickness [65,66]. Then, isotropic inhomogeneous material properties were derived from vBMD using the empirical equations of Morgan and colleagues [67,68] …”
Section: Calculation Of Impact Force and Hip Fracture Riskmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…Cases also had thinner 34,35 bone cortices. But re-calculated 2D DXA estimates of bending resistance (reflected in Section Modulus) were somewhat 36 or little better than BMD in predicting hip fracture. 37,38 Computed 3D tomography studies combined with finite element analysis (FEA) are generally superior to 2D DXA for predicting strength.…”
Section: Architectural Changes Associated With Hip Fracturementioning
confidence: 89%