2017
DOI: 10.1038/bonekey.2016.82
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Role of cortical bone in hip fracture

Abstract: In this review, I consider the varied mechanisms in cortical bone that help preserve its integrity and how they deteriorate with aging. Aging affects cortical bone in two ways: extrinsically through its effects on the individual that modify its mechanical loading experience and 'milieu interieur'; and intrinsically through the prolonged cycle of remodelling and renewal extending to an estimated 20 years in the proximal femur. Healthy femoral cortex incorporates multiple mechanisms that help prevent fracture. T… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1
1

Citation Types

0
10
0

Year Published

2017
2017
2022
2022

Publication Types

Select...
6
2

Relationship

0
8

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 18 publications
(10 citation statements)
references
References 138 publications
0
10
0
Order By: Relevance
“…Thus, due to cortical thinning and trabecular bone loss, the femoral neck in particular loses strength and becomes susceptible to fracture. Similarly, as the lateral cortex of the trochanter becomes thinner during aging, it has a higher potential to buckle during a fall impacting the hip [16].…”
Section: Hip Fracturesmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Thus, due to cortical thinning and trabecular bone loss, the femoral neck in particular loses strength and becomes susceptible to fracture. Similarly, as the lateral cortex of the trochanter becomes thinner during aging, it has a higher potential to buckle during a fall impacting the hip [16].…”
Section: Hip Fracturesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While there is a general consensus on treatment of stable fractures (A1, A2), the best way to treat unstable fractures remains controversial [17]. Simple trochanteric fractures are treated by extra-or intramedullary devices [16,22], mostly sliding hip screws and cephalo-medullary nails. While it appears that the use of cephalo-medullary nails is becoming more and more popular, there is no clear clinical evidence on the superiority of any surgical treatment method yet available [23].…”
Section: Treatment Of Trochanteric Fracturesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…From the anatomical point of view, the exact reduction of the posteromedial cortical bone wall, also called the Adams arch, is crucial for the healing process of a stable pertrochanteric fracture. After appropriate anatomical reduction, the implant (SHS) helps maintain the fragments in this position until the healing process is sufficient and the bone can take charge of load bearing [12]. This time is thought to be a minimum of 6 weeks.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…It is known that cortical bone components play important roles in maintaining the axial load bearing capacity of long bones 29 , 30 , thus the amplitude of mechanical load on a long bone, which is mainly composed of cortical bone components, might determine its strength 31 , 32 . A previous study that utilized HR-pQCT demonstrated that impaired cortical bone components in particular increased cortical porosity and are responsible for fragility fractures in postmenopausal T2DM females 9 .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%