Discourse Studies: A Multidisciplinary Introduction 2011
DOI: 10.4135/9781446289068.n15
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Cited by 111 publications
(79 citation statements)
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“…The most common functions of political discourse are: to compel, to oppose, to protest, to disguise, to legitimate, and to illegitimate (Chilton & Schaffner, 1997). These functions are commonly used by those who want to gain power or those who wish to sustain their power.…”
Section: Literature Review Political Discoursesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The most common functions of political discourse are: to compel, to oppose, to protest, to disguise, to legitimate, and to illegitimate (Chilton & Schaffner, 1997). These functions are commonly used by those who want to gain power or those who wish to sustain their power.…”
Section: Literature Review Political Discoursesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…To minimize possible contradictions, social policy discourse is based upon positive words, such as 'citizenship', 'inclusion' and, that most inclusive of terms, 'our' (the power of which is emphasized by Chilton & Schäffner, 1997).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Consequently, the terminology of the official and semi-official documentation examined here is positioned to have a particularly strong impact on both the formulation of discussion and on the meaning, import and impact of that formulation. Chilton and Schäffner (1997) refer to the (directly or subtly) coercive power employed by 'political actors' in their use of 'discourse in setting agendas, selecting topics … positioning the self and others in specific relationships, making assumptions about realities that hearers are obliged to at least temporarily accept ' (p. 212). It appears, then, that the way in which terminology has been developed in the key official documents on learning and skills development both has and is intended to have a forming effect on the way in which people think about these issues, not simply by virtue of persuasion through the argument, but by the use of language itself to create or reinforce assumptions.…”
Section: The Importance Of Languagementioning
confidence: 99%
“…A common discursive strategy in which such Opposition is realized is the positioning of a 'we-group' that is somehow at odds with a 'them' (cf. Atkinson 1984, Burkhardt 1993, Chilton and Schaffner 1997, de Fina 1995, Hutchby 1997, Johnson 1994, Maas 1985, Wilson 1990). …”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 96%
“…Political analyses would focus rather on the search for the political quality or aspect in discourses or how various interactive domains of the polity, media, etc., are made political. In order to begin to answer this question, it is instructive to follow Chilton and Schaffner's (1997) recommendations that linguistic behavior be related to political behavior. In their view, fine-grained linguistic analyses can shed some light on how texts, written and oral, function politically.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%