2021
DOI: 10.3390/su13020777
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Development of Models for Children—Pedestrian Crossing Speed at Signalized Crosswalks

Abstract: Modeling the behavior of pedestrians is an important tool in the analysis of their behavior and consequently ensuring the safety of pedestrian traffic. Children pedestrians show specific traffic behavior which is related to cognitive development, and the parameters that affect their traffic behavior are very different. The aim of this paper is to develop a model of the children-pedestrian’s speed at a signalized pedestrian crosswalk. For the same set of data collected in the city of Osijek—Croatia, two models … Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1
1

Citation Types

1
11
0

Year Published

2021
2021
2023
2023

Publication Types

Select...
9

Relationship

2
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 19 publications
(12 citation statements)
references
References 37 publications
1
11
0
Order By: Relevance
“…Table 5 compares the crossing time at the three signalized intersections in the two conditions and the mean value. It can be seen that while checking their phones, participants moved only slightly slower, taking on average 0.29 s longer to complete their passage, confirming the results of [9], which highlight a smaller impact of phone use on crossing time and speed than on reaction time. When plotting the crossing time in Figure 3, it was found that the range of crossing time when walking with the phone was between 8 s and 11 s, with a peak at 10 s when participants checked their phones.…”
Section: Crossing Time and Crossing Speedsupporting
confidence: 72%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Table 5 compares the crossing time at the three signalized intersections in the two conditions and the mean value. It can be seen that while checking their phones, participants moved only slightly slower, taking on average 0.29 s longer to complete their passage, confirming the results of [9], which highlight a smaller impact of phone use on crossing time and speed than on reaction time. When plotting the crossing time in Figure 3, it was found that the range of crossing time when walking with the phone was between 8 s and 11 s, with a peak at 10 s when participants checked their phones.…”
Section: Crossing Time and Crossing Speedsupporting
confidence: 72%
“…Starting from video recordings of different locations, they analyzed the recalled magnitudes and found mean crossing speeds of 1.45, 1.50 and 1.72 m•s −1 , respectively, for the three locations they studied. In their study [9], Ištoka Otković et al developed a model of pedestrian crossing speeds at signalized intersections and analyzed the influence of 14 factors (both individual and infrastructure-related) on the considered characteristic. Looking specifically at children, they found a mean crossing speed of 1.36 m•s −1 .…”
Section: Related Workmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Road traffic injury is the leading cause of death among children, and is the fourth leading cause of death in children between the age of 5 and 14 years [1][2][3]. Children are highly involved in these statistics as they have a share of 38% in the total number of pedestrian fatalities [4].…”
Section: Introduction 1traffic Accidents Among Childrenmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The increased use of cars has resulted in a considerable decrease in daily activity among children [4,5]. The importance of walkability in urban planning must be considered, because pedestrian movement is a significant part of urban mobility [6]. The research and analysis of walkability have been the focus of several studies.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%