2018
DOI: 10.4162/nrp.2018.12.3.215
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Abstract: BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVESThe prevalence of malnutrition among hospitalized children ranges between 12% and 24%. Although the consequences of hospital malnutrition are enormous, it is often unrecognized and untreated. The aim of this study was to identify the current status of in-hospital nutrition support for children in South Korea by carrying out a nationwide hospital-based survey.SUBJECTS/METHODSOut of 345 general and tertiary hospitals in South Korea, a total of 53 institutes with pediatric gastroenterologists… Show more

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Cited by 8 publications
(9 citation statements)
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“…A survey among Belgian pediatricians showed that only a small minority of the centers was using validated nutritional screening tools, while more than half of the respondents did indicate they performed some kind of nutritional screening [ 7 ]. Similar findings were reported in a South Korean survey [ 8 ]. While some favor the advantage of validated screening tools that are able to filter out patients at risk of nutritional deterioration during hospitalization and favor their simplicity [ 11 ], others give preference to axiological methods as they find them more pragmatic [ 5 , 12 ].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 91%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…A survey among Belgian pediatricians showed that only a small minority of the centers was using validated nutritional screening tools, while more than half of the respondents did indicate they performed some kind of nutritional screening [ 7 ]. Similar findings were reported in a South Korean survey [ 8 ]. While some favor the advantage of validated screening tools that are able to filter out patients at risk of nutritional deterioration during hospitalization and favor their simplicity [ 11 ], others give preference to axiological methods as they find them more pragmatic [ 5 , 12 ].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 91%
“…Although there are recommendations available from the WHO and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/ASPEN, literature on North American practices of assessment and management protocols for pediatric DAM is lacking. Furthermore, available survey literature from other continents mainly focuses on what happens during hospitalization [ 6 , 7 , 8 ]. Therefore, we aimed to survey all tertiary pediatric hospitals in Canada to address all pillars of DAM care in hospitalized children: prevention, screening and assessment, treatment as well as post-hospitalization follow-up.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A nationwide survey sent out to all members of the Korean Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition working in pediatric inpatient care revealed that only 52.5% of 40 participating hospitals had a nutrition support team [40]. Nutritional screening practices were less commonly performed for pediatric (55% of the centers) than adult patients (65.8% of the centers).…”
Section: Screening and Hospital Nutrition Care Processmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Most pediatric centers used a locally developed screening tool, although two centers implemented a validated screening tool (PNRS and STRONGkids). The survey identified a lack of time and manpower, inexperience, low financial reimbursement for nutrition care, and unavailable resources as the main barriers for nutritional support [40]. The same main barriers were named in a multicenter international survey among 693 pediatric gastrointestinal doctors and dieticians: low staff awareness on nutrition, lack of time and lack of local guidelines for nutrition screening, but also the absence of local guidelines or policy to screen [41].…”
Section: Screening and Hospital Nutrition Care Processmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Recently, De Longueville et al [ 80 ] reported that, when compared to an in-house developed software (Evalnut) that not only evaluates risk of malnutrition but it also provides advice for its management, dieticians were the most aware of the importance of nutritional assessment and management during the hospitalization period. Last, a South Korean nationwide hospital-based survey [ 81 ] revealed that only half of the surveyed tertiary- and general-care hospitals had the required nutritional support staff, and that their knowledge was insufficient leading to a failing identification upon admission.…”
Section: Hospital Practicesmentioning
confidence: 99%