2000
DOI: 10.1007/bf02344778
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Comparative analysis of different collagen-based biomaterials as scaffolds for long-term culture of human fibroblasts

Abstract: Biodegradable scaffolds, along with cells, are important components of most tissue-engineered constructs. In the study, there is a comparison of the behaviour of human fibroblasts cultured for up to six weeks in four different collagen-based three-dimensional matrices, in the form of sponges composed of pure native type I collagen (control), of collagen-GAG-chitosan (CGC) and of collagen cross-linked by two concentrations of diphenylphosphorylazide (DPPA-2 and DPPA-3). Variations in size and weight of the spon… Show more

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Cited by 54 publications
(37 citation statements)
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“…Collagen constitutes the greatest quantity of total proteins in human body, and is the major composition of extracellular matrix. Collagen gels as scaffolds have already been used successfully in the tissue engineering of skin because of their excellent biocompatibility, low antigenicity and high biodegradability (Jimenez and Jimenez 2004;Jones et al 2002;Auger et al 2004;Lee et al 2001;Vaissiere et al 2000). However, one potential drawback of using collagen gels in tissue-engineering is their dramatic contraction after being mixed with cells.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…Collagen constitutes the greatest quantity of total proteins in human body, and is the major composition of extracellular matrix. Collagen gels as scaffolds have already been used successfully in the tissue engineering of skin because of their excellent biocompatibility, low antigenicity and high biodegradability (Jimenez and Jimenez 2004;Jones et al 2002;Auger et al 2004;Lee et al 2001;Vaissiere et al 2000). However, one potential drawback of using collagen gels in tissue-engineering is their dramatic contraction after being mixed with cells.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…The disulfide-functionalized diblock copolymer hydrogel described herein is expected to be preferable to commercial protein-based gels, particularly for applications where the biological effects of such animal-derived gels are not acceptable, or are too variable. [27] This new synthetic hydrogel permits 3D culture of cells supported in mesh sheets and can be used to evaluate the effects of cell-ECM proteins for at least 12 days. In principle, thiol-disulfide chemistry can be used for convenient hydrogel functionalization with RGD, DNA or adhesion proteins to evaluate how these biomolecules influence cellular growth and proliferation.…”
Section: Cellular Densities Of A549-gfp Cells Became Indistinguishablmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Unfortunately, collagen sponges have a weak resistance at physiological temperature as they denaturate and contract. For this reason, sponges need to be cross-linked by chemical reagents such as glutaraldehyde, carbodiimides, or diphenyphosphorylazide [75,76]. Because of their process of fabrication, collagen sponges are acellular biomaterials.…”
Section: Collagen Spongesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Therefore, cells have to migrate and colonize the sponge. After three weeks in culture, fibroblasts seeded at the surface migrate into the sponge, proliferate, and fill the pores by deposition of new ECM components [76]. To fabricate sponges, atelocollagen collagen I can be associated with other molecules (collagen III, fibronectin, glycosaminoglycans) to form a hydrid scaffold [77].…”
Section: Collagen Spongesmentioning
confidence: 99%