2004
DOI: 10.1590/s1517-83822004000200009
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Abstract: The genetic relationships of 85 Arachis pintoi nodulating Rhizobium strains were determined using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) methods. The analysis included 75 strains isolated from Cerrado soils and 10 other ones of different origins. The results indicated that there is a high level of similarity between these strains and that geographic distribution may affect their phylogenetic relationship. In addition, the results allowed the selection of the most suitable primers for characterisation of t… Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(2 citation statements)
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“…Thus, this result is further evidence that PCR-RAPD is a useful tool to conduct persistence and competitiveness studies in rhizobia [30][31][32]. Also, it is in agreement with who tested 28 of indigenous rhizobia nodulating chickpea in India using RFLP to classify their isolates and who found that all RAPD primers detected one or more polymorphic DNA fragments among the studied rhizobia species and that RAPD is a very discriminative and efficient method for differentiating and studying genetic diversity of Rhizobium.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 65%
“…Thus, this result is further evidence that PCR-RAPD is a useful tool to conduct persistence and competitiveness studies in rhizobia [30][31][32]. Also, it is in agreement with who tested 28 of indigenous rhizobia nodulating chickpea in India using RFLP to classify their isolates and who found that all RAPD primers detected one or more polymorphic DNA fragments among the studied rhizobia species and that RAPD is a very discriminative and efficient method for differentiating and studying genetic diversity of Rhizobium.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 65%
“…However, this finding is not in agreement with the current knowledge that the peanut crop is usually nodulated by slow-growing rhizobia (Bradyrhizobium). Pinto et al (2004) confirmed the predominance of slowgrowing bacteria in Arachis pintoi grown in the soils of the Brazilian Cerrado (savannah). Taken together, these results indicate that peanut can form symbiosis with bacteria harboring diverse culture characteristics.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 66%