2016
DOI: 10.1590/1678-4162-8848
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Abstract: Differences in hoof balance between horses, mules and donkeys were identified in order to form more specific considerations for proper management of the animals. Measurements of the natural dimensions of hooves in sixty animals were used: 20 horses from the Crioulo breed, 20 mules and 20 donkeys from the Pêga breed. Liveweight was estimated using the correlation equations in each species by heart girth. Using a caliper rule, tape measure and hoof gauge, measurements of the length and width of the frog, hoof he… Show more

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Cited by 14 publications
(14 citation statements)
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“…However, hoof morphology in the donkey is markedly different to that of horses [4,21]. Although previous guidelines suggest that a donkey's hoof pastern axis should be straight [9], more recent hoof conformation guidelines suggest that a 'limited' broken forward hoof pastern axis, as compared to that of a horse, may be normal [24,25].…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, hoof morphology in the donkey is markedly different to that of horses [4,21]. Although previous guidelines suggest that a donkey's hoof pastern axis should be straight [9], more recent hoof conformation guidelines suggest that a 'limited' broken forward hoof pastern axis, as compared to that of a horse, may be normal [24,25].…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…( 27 ), while the width to length ratio and the wall thickness were a little lower in this study. The crown circumference of both breeds was larger than that of the Crioulo breed, having the same morphological characteristics ( 25 ). The AA wall H was in line with that found by Pütz ( 18 ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 89%
“…A standard procedure in morphological studies of equine distal limb anatomical structures focuses on one-dimensional linear or angular measures, such as hoof angle, hoof length, medial-lateral width of the phalanges, and so on, or two-dimensional measures, such as the joint surface. They are measured from radiographs ( 7 , 8 ), MRI data ( 9 ), photographs ( 8 , 9 ), or from in-situ measurements in vivo ( 10 , 11 ) or post-mortem ( 12 ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%