1999
DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-3008.1999.00078.x
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Bearded sakis in south-eastern Amazonia—back from the brink?

Abstract: The endemic bearded sakis Chiropotes satanas Satanas and Chiropotes satanas utahicki of south-eastern Amazonia are among the most threatened of this region's primates because of a combination of deforestation and hunting, and their apparent intolerance of habitat disturbance. Recent surveys at eight sites confirm that sakis are locally extinct in some areas where intense habitat fragmentation is exacerbated by hunting pressure, but also show that, in the absence of hunting, they can be relatively abundant in i… Show more

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Cited by 16 publications
(8 citation statements)
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References 14 publications
(11 reference statements)
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“…Previous studies of bearded saki populations have suggested a high degree of variability in group cohesiveness across study sites (Mittermeier and van Roosmalen, 1981; Ayres, 1989; Norconk and Kinzey, 1994; Ferrari and Lopes, 1996; Ferrari et al, 1999; Peetz, 2001; Veiga, 2006; Boyle, 2008; Pinto, 2008; Silva and Ferrari, 2009; Gregory, 2011). In this study, I sought to better quantify bearded saki cohesiveness and how it relates to resource availability and distribution.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 89%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Previous studies of bearded saki populations have suggested a high degree of variability in group cohesiveness across study sites (Mittermeier and van Roosmalen, 1981; Ayres, 1989; Norconk and Kinzey, 1994; Ferrari and Lopes, 1996; Ferrari et al, 1999; Peetz, 2001; Veiga, 2006; Boyle, 2008; Pinto, 2008; Silva and Ferrari, 2009; Gregory, 2011). In this study, I sought to better quantify bearded saki cohesiveness and how it relates to resource availability and distribution.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 89%
“…Like the other members of the tribe Pitheciini, bearded sakis are seed predators, with seeds making up over 50% of feeding time in almost all studies (Kinzey and Norconk, 1993; Norconk, 1996, 2011; Shaffer, 2012). Chiropotes lives in large, multimale‐multifemale groups that exhibit considerable variability in cohesiveness across studies (Mittermeier and van Roosmalen, 1981; Ayers, 1989; Frazao, 1992; Norconk and Kinzey, 1994; Ferrari and Lopes, 1996; Ferrari et al, 1999; Peetz, 2001; Veiga et al, 2006; Boyle, 2008; Pinto, 2008; Silva and Ferrari, 2009; Gregory, 2011). Some researchers have suggested bearded sakis travel in a relatively cohesive manner but fission upon entering food patches (Norconk and Kinzey, 1994), while others have reported a more regular pattern of subgrouping, with subgroups foraging independently of each other and maintaining their integrity for several days at a time (Fazao, 1992; Veiga et al, 2006).…”
Section: Bearded Sakismentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Callicebus , Chiropotes , and Pithecia can reside in forest fragments that are fractions of the size of the species' typical home range in continuous forest [Boyle et al, 2009, 2012; Boyle and Smith, ; DeLuycker, 2006, 2012, 2014; Kinzey and Becker, ; Setz, ; Setz and Gaspar, ; Setz et al, ; Silva and Ferrari, ; Veiga, ; Wagner et al, ]. Ferrari et al [] provided a relatively positive assessment of the ability of Chiropotes to live in forest fragments; however, the monkeys were locally extinct from a 200‐ha fragment, as well as the surrounding area (given the small size of the other fragments), and the “successful” fragments were relatively large (≥7500 ha). Although Callicebus , Chiropotes , and Pithecia have been documented in small (≤20 ha) habitat fragments, and some species have been noted to be tolerant of habitat fragmentation (e.g.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…To begin with, the species is apparently absent from two of the sites (1 and 3) with the best potential for the long-term conservation of the region's primates (Ferrari et al 1999).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%