2016
DOI: 10.1590/1982-0224-20160133
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Abstract: Fishing pressure affects the behavior of reef fish, especially of fishery-targeted species. In this context, it is critical to understand if fish behavior is preserved in no-take areas (NTAs), which are considered the best instrument for the recovery of fish stocks. Comparing the flight initiation distances (FIDs) of fish inhabiting multiple-use areas (MUAs), where fishing is allowed (including spearfishing), and NTAs is a useful approach to test whether NTAs can be effective as fish refuges. Here, we compared… Show more

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Cited by 14 publications
(3 citation statements)
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“…In regard to traditional underwater visual census, a widespread technique to study reef fishes, fish-scuba diver interactions are a common methodological bias (Kulbicki, 1998;Harvey et al, 2002). This is specifically problematic when studying large bodied species, such as groupers, snappers and parrotfishes (Gotanda et al, 2009;Januchowski-Hartley et al, 2011), commonly targeted along the tropical coast of Brazil (Nunes et al, 2012(Nunes et al, , 2016.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In regard to traditional underwater visual census, a widespread technique to study reef fishes, fish-scuba diver interactions are a common methodological bias (Kulbicki, 1998;Harvey et al, 2002). This is specifically problematic when studying large bodied species, such as groupers, snappers and parrotfishes (Gotanda et al, 2009;Januchowski-Hartley et al, 2011), commonly targeted along the tropical coast of Brazil (Nunes et al, 2012(Nunes et al, , 2016.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The new geographic data available for G. clenchi suggests that this species may have a continuous distribution from the Caribbean to northeastern Brazil. This geographical pattern can be found in many other mollusc species (Mikkelsen and Bieler 2007, Rios 2009 and other marine invertebrates (Barreira and Margarida 1994), despite high endemism of coral species (Leão 1999, Segal and Castro 2000, Leão and Kikuchi 2001, Nunes et al 2016, Zilberberg et al 2016 and reef fish (Moura 2000, Dutra et al 2005, Nunes et al 2016 occurs at Abrolhos Bank. Moreover, Absalão (2005) suggested that the region may constitute a discreet biogeographical unity, with as much as 12.9% of the mollusc species being endemic, although not other groups, like Crustacea and Polychaeta (Dutra et al 2005).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 90%
“…The Abrolhos Bank (17°20′-18°00′S and 038°30′-039°30′W) (Fig. 2B) is a 200 km thickening of the Eastern Brazilian Continental Shelf that harbours the largest and richest coral reef complex of the Southern Atlantic (Leão 1999, Leão et al 2003Nunes et al 2016). The local reef structures differ from their Caribbean counterparts by their morphology, sediment types, and organisms involved in their construction (Leão 1999, Leão et al 2003, Zilberberg et al 2016.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%