2013
DOI: 10.1111/ijlh.12122
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An investigation of the protective effect of alpha+‐thalassaemia against severe Plasmodium falciparum amongst children in Kumasi, Ghana

Abstract: This is an electronic version of a PhD thesis awarded by the University of Westminster. © The Author, 2012. This is an exact reproduction of the paper copy held by the University of Westminster library.The WestminsterResearch online digital archive at the University of Westminster aims to make the research output of the University available to a wider audience. Copyright and Moral Rights remain with the authors and/or copyright owners. Users are permitted to download and/or print one copy for non-commercial pr… Show more

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Cited by 4 publications
(2 citation statements)
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References 101 publications
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“…This study investigated associations between the α-thalassaemia trait and P. falciparum asexual parasitaemia and gametocytaemia in subjects of different demographic backgrounds in malaria endemic communities in southern Ghana. The overall distribution of heterozygous α–thalassaemia observed in this study area was relatively higher (20% to 30%) than observed in other parts of the country [4, 18, 19]. This was probably due to the fact that the community is populated with diverse ethnicity, hence there might have been a lot of inter marriages among the various tribes that might have influenced heterozygosity.…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 55%
“…This study investigated associations between the α-thalassaemia trait and P. falciparum asexual parasitaemia and gametocytaemia in subjects of different demographic backgrounds in malaria endemic communities in southern Ghana. The overall distribution of heterozygous α–thalassaemia observed in this study area was relatively higher (20% to 30%) than observed in other parts of the country [4, 18, 19]. This was probably due to the fact that the community is populated with diverse ethnicity, hence there might have been a lot of inter marriages among the various tribes that might have influenced heterozygosity.…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 55%
“… 14 A case-control study in Africa and Papua New Guinea (PNG) found that silent α-thalassemia protects against P. falciparum . 8 9 , 18 21 Alpha-thalassemia trait -- SEA deletion was commonly found in Thailand and Southeast Asia (SEA). 15 – 16 The -- SEA allele has been identified as the recent balancing selected allele triggered by malaria.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%