2019
DOI: 10.1590/1981-5271v43suplemento1-20190022.ing
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abdominal Computed Tomography in the Emergency Room: Overuse of Medical Technologies and the Depreciation of Clinical Diagnosis

Abstract: The number of computed tomography (CT) examinations performed in urgent care has been increasing since its introduction in the emergency room (ER). This has led to a substantial increase in hospital costs and patient’s exposure to ionizing radiation, which has led to the need for more judicious use of CT in the ER. The aim of this study is to show the difference between clinical (pre-CT), tomographic (post-CT) and definitive diagnoses in patients with abdominal CT in the ER. This is a cross-sectional study, wi… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1

Citation Types

0
1
0

Year Published

2022
2022
2022
2022

Publication Types

Select...
1

Relationship

0
1

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 1 publication
(1 citation statement)
references
References 22 publications
0
1
0
Order By: Relevance
“…But whether the problems meet strict and changing academic definitions are far less important than tackling what are clear and widespread problems with diagnostic processes that cause harm and waste via overtreatment of malaria, and undertreatment of undiagnosed conditions. Another limitation arises from excluding studies which did not fully meet our inclusion criteria, but raise valuable concerns about potential overdiagnosis or misdiagnosis across a range of infectious and non-infectious conditions, including HIV, 46 cervical abnormalities, 47 appendicitis 48 and entamoeba histolytica, 49 suggesting the review findings may be underestimating the existence of these problems in LMICs. A final limitation arises from this being a broad scoping review, with no critical appraisal of the quality of included studies.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…But whether the problems meet strict and changing academic definitions are far less important than tackling what are clear and widespread problems with diagnostic processes that cause harm and waste via overtreatment of malaria, and undertreatment of undiagnosed conditions. Another limitation arises from excluding studies which did not fully meet our inclusion criteria, but raise valuable concerns about potential overdiagnosis or misdiagnosis across a range of infectious and non-infectious conditions, including HIV, 46 cervical abnormalities, 47 appendicitis 48 and entamoeba histolytica, 49 suggesting the review findings may be underestimating the existence of these problems in LMICs. A final limitation arises from this being a broad scoping review, with no critical appraisal of the quality of included studies.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%