2017
DOI: 10.1016/j.jcbs.2016.11.007
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Abstract: Objectives: 1) to evaluate diff erent attachment styles depending on the attachment figure; 2) to explore the association between experiential avoidance and paranoid ideation frequency; 3) to test a mediation model in which the impact of adult attachment on frequency of paranoid ideation occurs through experiential avoidance. Method: We assessed adult-attachment, experiential avoidance and paranoid ideation frequency in a sample of 37 (30 male and 7 female) outpatients and inpatients with a psychosis-spectrum … Show more

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Cited by 21 publications
(23 citation statements)
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“…The inclusion of participants with affective psychoses in this study could have introduced heterogeneity, and the sample size was small, limiting generalizability of findings. In another study, attachment was positively associated with paranoia ( r = .33) in an inpatient sample (Castilho et al ., ). Mediation analyses reported that experiential avoidance mediated the relationship between attachment anxiety and paranoia.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 97%
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“…The inclusion of participants with affective psychoses in this study could have introduced heterogeneity, and the sample size was small, limiting generalizability of findings. In another study, attachment was positively associated with paranoia ( r = .33) in an inpatient sample (Castilho et al ., ). Mediation analyses reported that experiential avoidance mediated the relationship between attachment anxiety and paranoia.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…The two studies that used longitudinal designs were considered more methodologically robust in the assessment of this association and achieved a moderate rating (Berry et al ., ; Sitko et al ., ). Six studies (Castilho et al ., ; Dozier & Lee, ; Fett et al ., ; Korver‐Nieberg et al ., ; MacBeth et al ., ; Strand et al ., ) did not statistically control for relevant confounders (e.g., illness severity, comorbidity of hallucinations). Two studies were rated as strong (Sitko et al ., ; Wickham et al ., ) as these controlled for several relevant confounders.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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