2021
DOI: 10.3389/fdgth.2021.725088
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The Sociotechnical Ethics of Digital Health: A Critique and Extension of Approaches From Bioethics

Abstract: The widespread adoption of digital technologies raises important ethical issues in health care and public health. In our view, understanding these ethical issues demands a perspective that looks beyond the technology itself to include the sociotechnical system in which it is situated. In this sense, a sociotechnical system refers to the broader collection of material devices, interpersonal relationships, organizational policies, corporate contracts, and government regulations that shape the ways in which digit… Show more

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Cited by 28 publications
(7 citation statements)
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References 63 publications
(112 reference statements)
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“…When such a collaboration occurred, AI technologies were primarily designed in HICs and implemented in LMICs. This divide between the location of development and location of the implementation of AI in global oncology can pose a barrier to integration in LMICs due to costs [ 102 ] and infrastructural considerations [ 88 ], thereby suggesting a need for greater attention to co-design, which refers to the involvement of end users in the design process of AI technologies [ 159 ]. Moreover, it is important to recognize that the inclusion of researchers from LMICs in the design of AI technologies alone does not guarantee widespread improvements in health for patients in these countries.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…When such a collaboration occurred, AI technologies were primarily designed in HICs and implemented in LMICs. This divide between the location of development and location of the implementation of AI in global oncology can pose a barrier to integration in LMICs due to costs [ 102 ] and infrastructural considerations [ 88 ], thereby suggesting a need for greater attention to co-design, which refers to the involvement of end users in the design process of AI technologies [ 159 ]. Moreover, it is important to recognize that the inclusion of researchers from LMICs in the design of AI technologies alone does not guarantee widespread improvements in health for patients in these countries.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For example, treatment patterns produced by Watson for Oncology, an AI decision support system trained by data and experts from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, may be inapplicable to many LMICs [ 173 ]. In previous studies investigating this issue, some researchers have argued for the co-design of AI technologies, which requires the involvement of end users—and specifically marginalized groups—in AI research and development to ensure the equitable distribution of the benefits of these technologies [ 159 , 174 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The challenges to individual and community ethical practices of medicine and generalizations to digital health [6] have become more acute than ever as a result of the dramatic leaps in digital technologies pervasively influencing all aspects of human life since Grémy quoted Claude Bernard over 30 years ago about medicine being "a science forced to practice before it is ready" [7]. Since then there has been rapid acceleration of scientific advances enabling increasing understanding of the manifold illnesses and their complications afflicting humans strongly and effectively enabled by bioinformatics methods advancing investigations and experiments into the foundational biomolecular, and biomedical and social determinants and effects of illnesses in individuals and populations [8,9].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Furthermore, technology’s mediation of human-to-human relations may result in ethical dilemmas [ 8 ]. Therefore, a broader perspective is needed where both the context and future implications for human life are considered [ 9 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%