2019
DOI: 10.1111/lasr.12380
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The Making and Unmaking of Feminicidio/Femicidio Laws in Mexico and Nicaragua

Abstract: This article examines the contested process of law‐making related to the killing of women which resulted in the criminalization of feminicide (feminicidio) and femicide (femicidio) in Mexico and Nicaragua, two countries in which feminists engaged in legal activism to increase state accountability for gendered violence. Through comparative analysis, we demonstrate the importance of (1) the interaction between shifting local political conditions and supranational opportunities and (2) the position of feminist ac… Show more

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Cited by 10 publications
(17 citation statements)
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“…Under the principle of due diligence, the Belém Do Pará Convention imposes positive obligations on states to take action to protect women from violence (García-Del Moral and Dersnah 2014; Rubio-Marín and Estrada-Tanck 2013). The transnational advocacy network used the reports to “name and shame” Mexico, undermining its status in the international community, and to pressure it into changing practices toward gender violence (Aikin Araluce 2011; García-Del Moral and Neumann 2019). As part of this process, activists turned feminicidio into a frame accusing the Mexican state of violating women’s human rights (García-Del Moral 2016).…”
Section: Feminicidio Transnational Feminist Activism and The Mexicamentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Under the principle of due diligence, the Belém Do Pará Convention imposes positive obligations on states to take action to protect women from violence (García-Del Moral and Dersnah 2014; Rubio-Marín and Estrada-Tanck 2013). The transnational advocacy network used the reports to “name and shame” Mexico, undermining its status in the international community, and to pressure it into changing practices toward gender violence (Aikin Araluce 2011; García-Del Moral and Neumann 2019). As part of this process, activists turned feminicidio into a frame accusing the Mexican state of violating women’s human rights (García-Del Moral 2016).…”
Section: Feminicidio Transnational Feminist Activism and The Mexicamentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In 2009, the Court issued the judgment González and Others “Cotton Fiel” , v. Mexico concerning the sexual murder of three young women, whose mutilated bodies were found in a cotton field in Ciudad Juarez in November 2001, and the local authorities’ fabrication of evidence to solve these crimes. The Court found that through inaction, the Mexican state had violated these women’s rights and urged it to address feminicidio (García-Del Moral and Neumann 2019; Rubio-Marín and Estrada-Tanck 2013). Feminist legislators used the bicameral Equity and Gender Commissions and Special Feminicidio Commission to channel international pressure as leverage to pass the General Law on Women’s Access to a Life Free of Violence and codify feminicidio as a crime (García-Del Moral and Neumann 2019).…”
Section: Feminicidio Transnational Feminist Activism and The Mexicamentioning
confidence: 99%
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“… 2 See, e.g., Weldon 2002; Smulovitz 2015; Htun and Weldon 2012; Franceschet 2010; Beer 2017; O'Brien 2015; O'Brien and Walsh 2020; García-Del Moral and Neumann 2019.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%