2016
DOI: 10.1037/xge0000200
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

The elusive nature of the blocking effect: 15 failures to replicate.

Abstract: With the discovery of the blocking effect, learning theory took a huge leap forward, because blocking provided a crucial clue that surprise is what drives learning. This in turn stimulated the development of novel association-formation theories of learning. Eventually, the ability to explain blocking became nothing short of a touchstone for the validity of any theory of learning, including propositional and other nonassociative theories. The abundance of publications reporting a blocking effect and the importa… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1
1

Citation Types

8
98
2

Year Published

2017
2017
2020
2020

Publication Types

Select...
7
1

Relationship

1
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 61 publications
(108 citation statements)
references
References 77 publications
8
98
2
Order By: Relevance
“…In contrast, the Lego task variant in which OS was demonstrated may have more in common with other human associative learning tasks which have reported an OS effect (e.g., geometric place learning [31,55]). In any event, the findings of the present study suggest that the presence of OS may depend on certain parameters within the design of the experiment, as appears to be the case for KB [56].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 56%
“…In contrast, the Lego task variant in which OS was demonstrated may have more in common with other human associative learning tasks which have reported an OS effect (e.g., geometric place learning [31,55]). In any event, the findings of the present study suggest that the presence of OS may depend on certain parameters within the design of the experiment, as appears to be the case for KB [56].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 56%
“…These findings have been observed across different preparations, sensory modalities, and species. In light of this analysis, failures to observe cue competition (like instances reported by Maes et al, 2016) should perhaps not Competition and Facilitation 25 be considered exceptional. It is perhaps time to begin to consider three different outcomes as resulting from cue interactions (competition, no interaction, facilitation), and develop theories that account for what so far have been considered as disparate (domain specific) findings.…”
Section: Competition and Facilitation 24mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Despite the generality and theoretical importance of cue competition phenomena, a recent report by Maes et al (2016) documented 15 failures to observe blocking in rats and mice out of 15 attempts. These carefully controlled experiments were run in different laboratories (KU Leuven, UCLA) and using stimuli of different sensory modalities (visual, auditory), motivational systems (appetitive, aversive), and species (rats, mice).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…And when multiple cues are presented in compound without reinforcement and one of those cues is separately reinforced, either excitatory behavioral control (second-order conditioning) or inhibitory behavioral control (Pavlovian conditioned inhibition) by the nonreinforced cue can result (Pavlov, 1927). Further complicating any theoretical analysis of the empirical literature is the fact that attempts to replicate even widely cited empirical effects have not been universally successful (e.g., Maes et al, 2016). …”
Section: Introduction: Models and Computational Simulationsmentioning
confidence: 99%