2011
DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-6486.2010.00963.x
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Subsidiary Integration as Identity Construction and Institution Building: A Political Sensemaking Approach

Abstract: This paper develops a political sensemaking approach to the post-acquisition integration process, which directs attention to how powerful social actors construct the relationship between multinational corporations (MNCs) and their multiple local contexts. This political, processual and actor-centred perspective explores subsidiary integration as identity construction and institution building. The different characteristics that local and head office managers attribute to the subsidiary establish diverse interes… Show more

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Cited by 128 publications
(142 citation statements)
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References 80 publications
(138 reference statements)
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“…Notwithstanding the broader literature on power and politics in organizations (e.g., Eisenhardt & Bourgeois, 1988;Pfeffer & Moore, 1980;Clegg, Courpasson & Phillips, 2006), extant work has only scratched the surface of politics in PMI (Vaara, 2003;Tienari & Vaara, 2012). Prior work suggests that socio-political factors affect interactions between key actors in PMI (e.g., Clark & Geppert, 2011), and that PMI may be linked with broader cultural or societal power relationships and political processes (Hellgren et al, 2002;Tienari, Vaara & Björkman, 2003;Tienari et al, 2005). However, it is notable that current work has mainly focused on the causes and consequences of conflicts in the post-acquisition company.…”
Section: Decision-makingmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Notwithstanding the broader literature on power and politics in organizations (e.g., Eisenhardt & Bourgeois, 1988;Pfeffer & Moore, 1980;Clegg, Courpasson & Phillips, 2006), extant work has only scratched the surface of politics in PMI (Vaara, 2003;Tienari & Vaara, 2012). Prior work suggests that socio-political factors affect interactions between key actors in PMI (e.g., Clark & Geppert, 2011), and that PMI may be linked with broader cultural or societal power relationships and political processes (Hellgren et al, 2002;Tienari, Vaara & Björkman, 2003;Tienari et al, 2005). However, it is notable that current work has mainly focused on the causes and consequences of conflicts in the post-acquisition company.…”
Section: Decision-makingmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Subectification 'over' organizations as a site of power might be useful for understanding this phenomenon too. For example, Clark and Geppert (2011) emphasize this form of power in their investigation of the way a post-Soviet organization merged into a Western MNC context. Given the divergence of cultural values between the two organizations, the researcher's note how a new set of 'sense making' protocols were produced in order for Western commercial values to become internalized by employees.…”
Section: Subjectification 'Over' Organizationsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While cultural differences may indeed create challenges as organizations strive to achieve social integration (Björkman et al 2007), the use of shared values has been recognized as an effective mechanism to "glue" networks of differentiated foreign subsidiaries together (Clark and Geppert 2011;Nohria and Ghoshal 1994;Persson 2006). National cultures are furthermore often compatible with a diverse range of values, suggesting that local adaptations of values can be successful even if they do not mirror the most common local practices (d 'Iribarne 2012a'Iribarne , 2012b).…”
Section: Mne Integration Socialization and The Role Of Valuesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Several integration mechanisms have been identified and studied extensively over the past decades. While the majority of studies have emphasized the design of formal organizational structures such as standardized processes and centralized decision-making (Keupp et al 2011), the growing recognition that many MNEs operate as differentiated networks has also lead to an increased attention to less formal integration mechanisms such as internal socialization processes (Clark and Geppert 2011). Despite the recognition of numerous integration mechanisms, however, we still have limited insight into how MNEs actually achieve integration (Keupp et al 2011).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%