2004
DOI: 10.1080/1356251042000252354
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Students making progress and the ‘research‐teaching nexus’ debate

Abstract: The paper draws on an extensive literature search about the 'research-teaching nexus', insights from interviewing twelve university history lecturers about student progress in undergraduate degrees, and ideas about the role of disciplines in student learning to argue (i) that the educational goal for students of 'becoming a practising historian' is more desirable than 'acquiring transferable skills'; and (ii) that research activity is a 'strong condition' for teachers of university history to pursue the former. Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1
1

Citation Types

0
31
0
1

Year Published

2013
2013
2020
2020

Publication Types

Select...
4
3

Relationship

0
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 37 publications
(32 citation statements)
references
References 29 publications
(41 reference statements)
0
31
0
1
Order By: Relevance
“…In the intangible nexus, the more tacit, not directly observable forms of integration of research and teaching are grouped, such as creating an inquisitive research climate, fostering an innovative atmosphere, or stimulating the development of students' research dispositions. Intangible elements have often been denoted by teachers and by educational researchers as relevant elements of learning to do research, but few researchers (McLean and Barker 2004;Elen et al 2007;Elen and Verburgh 2008) have addressed the relation between these intangible elements of the research-teaching nexus and students' experiences of courses.…”
Section: Tangible and Intangible Nexus Between Research And Teachingmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the intangible nexus, the more tacit, not directly observable forms of integration of research and teaching are grouped, such as creating an inquisitive research climate, fostering an innovative atmosphere, or stimulating the development of students' research dispositions. Intangible elements have often been denoted by teachers and by educational researchers as relevant elements of learning to do research, but few researchers (McLean and Barker 2004;Elen et al 2007;Elen and Verburgh 2008) have addressed the relation between these intangible elements of the research-teaching nexus and students' experiences of courses.…”
Section: Tangible and Intangible Nexus Between Research And Teachingmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These benefits are also associated with the process of enriching teaching practice by including aspects of an academic's current research, or that of colleagues, in order to support student learning and one's teaching practice. Moreover, as stated by McLean and Barker (2004), students are, increasingly, becoming less able to gain from their teachers' research activity. Like Willetts (2013: 43), we believe we need to "revisit Robbins", call for "a cultural change back towards teaching" and realise that, above all, all academics involved in teaching are 'expert learners' helping 'novice learners' (Brew and Lucas, 2009;Brew, 1999: 297).…”
Section: Unveiling the (Un)intended Consequencesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…As a result, academics have tended to be designated as 'mainly teachers' or as 'researchactive', whilst postgraduate students and part-time teachers are taken on in order to free fulltime academics for research and young academics are offered "teaching-only" temporary posts (McLean and Barker, 2004). In Australia, such performance expectations of academic staff have led many to cope with these demands by using discretionary funds to buy themselves out of teaching activities in order to create the time for research and publication (Smith and Smith, 2012).…”
Section: Unveiling the (Un)intended Consequencesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In addition to teachers' beliefs, mediators that have had effects on academics' experience of the relationship between teaching and research include conceptions of research (Coate, Barnett, & Williams, 2001;Prosser, Martin, Trigwell, Ramsden, & Lueckenhausen, 2005) and of learning (McLean & Barker, 2004). For example, pressures to compartmentalize teaching and research, management strategies of academic staff time, and competition for funding have shaped the ways in which teaching and research can have an influence on each other.…”
Section: Barriers To Achieving a Balance Among Research Teaching Anmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Enhancing and strengthening a positive, mutually beneficial relationship between teaching and research as inquiry is a core part of the identity of many academics (McLean & Barker, 2004). However, the nature, frequency, and strength of this link have often been limited to anecdotal rationalization with a recurring criticism that undergraduate education is perceived as less of a priority when compared to research and professional activities (Bok, 2006;Finkelstein, 2001).…”
Section: Literature Review Bringing Inquiry Into the Classroommentioning
confidence: 99%