2016
DOI: 10.1590/1806-9061-2015-0178
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Storage Period Affects Weight Loss of Japanese Quail Eggs

Abstract: Long storage periods may increase embryo mortality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of storage period on the weight loss, eggshell surface temperature, hatchability, and embryonic mortality of Japanese quail eggs. Two hundred fertile eggs were collected from a flock of 30-week-old Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica). The eggs were collected for 10 consecutive days after lay, and immediately incubated. A completely randomized experimental design with 10 treatments, corresponding… Show more

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Cited by 10 publications
(5 citation statements)
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“…For the entire period from egg setting till 15 day of incubation, eggs lost significantly more weight when the storage duration was longer as eggs stored for 14 days lost 9.42% of weight while, eggs stored for 7 or 2 days lost 8.85% and 8.28%, respectively. This result is similar to previous observations by Roriz, et al, (2016). High egg weight losses could be a reason for incidence of high early embryonic mortalities because of dehydration, while, insufficient weight losses causes presence of excessive water in the egg that so embryos are not able to inflate their lungs immediately before hatch and that leads to late embryonic mortalities (Sarcinelli, 2012).…”
Section: Egg Weight Losssupporting
confidence: 91%
“…For the entire period from egg setting till 15 day of incubation, eggs lost significantly more weight when the storage duration was longer as eggs stored for 14 days lost 9.42% of weight while, eggs stored for 7 or 2 days lost 8.85% and 8.28%, respectively. This result is similar to previous observations by Roriz, et al, (2016). High egg weight losses could be a reason for incidence of high early embryonic mortalities because of dehydration, while, insufficient weight losses causes presence of excessive water in the egg that so embryos are not able to inflate their lungs immediately before hatch and that leads to late embryonic mortalities (Sarcinelli, 2012).…”
Section: Egg Weight Losssupporting
confidence: 91%
“…The positive effect of PI and T of hatching eggs during storage was proven based on the example of chicken (Fasenko et al, 2001b;Reijrink et al, 2009) and turkey eggs (Bakst and Gupta, 1997;Fasenko et al, 2001a). The scarce studies on quail eggs, in which PI (Usman et al, 2008;Yildirim et al, 2015) and T (Roriz et al, 2016) were applied during storage have not provided comprehensive results.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the present study, weight loss ratios for 7-and 14-day storage were similar to those of Aygun & Sert (2013), who reported weight loss at 1.72% for 7-day storage and 2.73% for 14-day storage. ,b Differences in means in the same column with different superscripts are significant at P <0.05 Roriz et al (2016) investigated the effects of various storage durations (1 -10 days) on weight loss and hatch outcomes, and reported weight loss of 0.97% for 1-day storage, 2.8% for 7-day storage and 3.26% for 10-day storage. Fidan (2012) reported weight loss of quail eggs for 5-, 10-and 15-day storage as 0.34%, 0.85% and 1.45%, respectively.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%