2019
DOI: 10.21615/cesp.12.1.1
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Stigmatising attitudes towards suicide by gender and age

Abstract: This cross-sectional study aimed to analyse the association between gender and age with stigmatising attitudes towards suicide. We collected a non-probabilistic sample of 344 Portuguese individuals aged 16 to 66. The data were collected via questionnaire and then analysed with frequency analysis and chi-squared test. Results suggest that more men revealed stigmatising attitudes. However, the gender effect was more evident within adolescents than within adults. Age effect was also found, revealing that adults h… Show more

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Cited by 10 publications
(8 citation statements)
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“…While tentative, it is not clear why the apparent protectiveness of cultural norms and religious beliefs could be less influential for youth suicidal behaviour than that among older adults. Although highly speculative for this context, some literature suggests that religious beliefs tend to intensify with increasing age for some (Bengtson et al ., 2015 ), while older adults may also have more stigmatising attitudes towards suicidal behaviour than youth (Pereira and Cardoso, 2019 ). Future studies should investigate risk and protective factors for suicidal behaviour among young refugees.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While tentative, it is not clear why the apparent protectiveness of cultural norms and religious beliefs could be less influential for youth suicidal behaviour than that among older adults. Although highly speculative for this context, some literature suggests that religious beliefs tend to intensify with increasing age for some (Bengtson et al ., 2015 ), while older adults may also have more stigmatising attitudes towards suicidal behaviour than youth (Pereira and Cardoso, 2019 ). Future studies should investigate risk and protective factors for suicidal behaviour among young refugees.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A study showed that attitude to permissiveness of suicide attempts were significantly higher in women than men, according to which females were about three times as likely as males to report permissive attitudes [33]. Literature refers to a phenomenon called gender paradox in suicide according to which men have a lower rates of suicidal ideation, but use more lethal suicide methods and kill themselves three to four times more than women whereas women reveal greater levels of suicidal ideation and of suicide attempts [34]. Evidence shows that women who attempt suicide are less likely to die, so they usually choose methods with less lethality.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, there are also contradictory study results in this regard: The study by Batterham et al [ 57 ] showed here that young adults would stigmatise suicide or suicidal acts more strongly than people in high adulthood—although the young adults had better knowledge regarding suicide. Pereira and Cardoso [ 116 ], on the other hand, found that adults were more stigmatizing towards suicidality compared to adolescents. This effect was particularly pronounced among the female participants in their study.…”
Section: Age-specific Suicidality and The Connection With Stigmatizationmentioning
confidence: 99%