2020
DOI: 10.1177/0264550520962207
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Social media: A challenge to identity and relational desistance

Abstract: Society has witnessed a rapid growth in the prevalence and use of social media. The influence and impact of this expansion has sparsely, if at all, been considered within the context of desistance from crime. This article draws upon the narratives of male and female service users subject to community supervision by a Community Rehabilitation Company, collected as part of a doctoral thesis. Evidence demonstrates how social media plays a largely negative role, with some gendered difference on a service user’s id… Show more

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Cited by 3 publications
(5 citation statements)
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References 81 publications
(149 reference statements)
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“…This stigmatisation is exacerbated by the wider media, where women are given greater attention (Malloch and McIvor, 2011) and seen as somewhat other when involved in crime (Jewkes, 2015). Local media also reaffirms gendered expectations and stereotypes (Barlow, 2015), perpetuated by social media which increases feelings of shame and guilt when criminalised (Rutter, 2020). Lageson and Maruna (2018: 115) note;Public exposure of past crime and misdemeanours carries a specific type of shaming stigmatisation that violates privacy and takes away control over one’s identity, complicating desistance and reintegration processes.As will be argued in this article, both shame and stigmatisation are influenced by individuals’ responsibilisation, affecting criminalised women’s relationships, and ultimately their desistance from both crime and risk of harm through victimisation.…”
Section: The Prevalence Of Shame Guilt and Stigmatisationmentioning
confidence: 95%
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“…This stigmatisation is exacerbated by the wider media, where women are given greater attention (Malloch and McIvor, 2011) and seen as somewhat other when involved in crime (Jewkes, 2015). Local media also reaffirms gendered expectations and stereotypes (Barlow, 2015), perpetuated by social media which increases feelings of shame and guilt when criminalised (Rutter, 2020). Lageson and Maruna (2018: 115) note;Public exposure of past crime and misdemeanours carries a specific type of shaming stigmatisation that violates privacy and takes away control over one’s identity, complicating desistance and reintegration processes.As will be argued in this article, both shame and stigmatisation are influenced by individuals’ responsibilisation, affecting criminalised women’s relationships, and ultimately their desistance from both crime and risk of harm through victimisation.…”
Section: The Prevalence Of Shame Guilt and Stigmatisationmentioning
confidence: 95%
“…Taking a gendered comparative sample, the first explored the role of whole relational networks in the processes of desistance, through a consideration of opportunities for co-production (Rutter, 2019(Rutter, , 2020. Longitudinal fieldwork was carried out over an 18 month period between late 2017 and early 2019, within 'Female Street' women's centre contracted to deliver support to criminalised women within a Community Rehabilitation Company.…”
Section: Drawing Together Narrative Research With Womenmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…The crime of sexual intercourse and molestation against children is increasingly widespread (Joleby, Lunde, Landström, & Jonsson, 2021). The rapid development of society and the increase in crime in social life have an impact on a tendency of members of the community themselves to interact with one another (Rutter, 2021). This interaction often occurs when an act violates the law or the rules that have been determined in society (Utama, 2021), to create a sense of security, peace, and order in society (Anwar, 2021).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%