2016
DOI: 10.1590/0004-282x20160105
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Sleep disorder investigation might be considered to be mandatory in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder guideline

Abstract: Objective To determine the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children with attention deficit/hyperactive disorder (ADHD) and compare amplitude and latency of the P300 potential among children with and without OSA. Method Sixty-one children with ADHD underwent oddball auditory attention tests for detection of P300 (ERPs) followed by an all-night polysomnography. The children were divided in two groups, those with and without OSA. Results Significant decreased amplitude of the P300 potential wa… Show more

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Cited by 8 publications
(4 citation statements)
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References 22 publications
(30 reference statements)
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“…Miano et al (2019) report that children with ADHD ( n = 30, 8–12 years) showed a higher Apnea-Hypoapnea Index (AHI) than control group children ( n = 25). The particular functional importance of sleep-disordered breathing in children with ADHD was shown in a study in which 61 (8–13 year old) children with ADHD with or without obstructive sleep apnea underwent an oddball auditory attention test coupled with detection of P300 (Event related potentials) followed by an all-night PSG, and revealed significant decreased amplitude of the P300 potential in children with Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) +ADHD, when compared with children with only ADHD (Henriques Filho, 2016). However, there is not complete concordance between studies in this area: a two night PSG data (6–12 years) revealed no significant differences between control group ( n = 28) and children with ADHD ( n = 28) for presence of an AHI >1 (where a threshold of >1 AHI event per hour is of clinical relevance) or snoring (Galland et al, 2011).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Miano et al (2019) report that children with ADHD ( n = 30, 8–12 years) showed a higher Apnea-Hypoapnea Index (AHI) than control group children ( n = 25). The particular functional importance of sleep-disordered breathing in children with ADHD was shown in a study in which 61 (8–13 year old) children with ADHD with or without obstructive sleep apnea underwent an oddball auditory attention test coupled with detection of P300 (Event related potentials) followed by an all-night PSG, and revealed significant decreased amplitude of the P300 potential in children with Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) +ADHD, when compared with children with only ADHD (Henriques Filho, 2016). However, there is not complete concordance between studies in this area: a two night PSG data (6–12 years) revealed no significant differences between control group ( n = 28) and children with ADHD ( n = 28) for presence of an AHI >1 (where a threshold of >1 AHI event per hour is of clinical relevance) or snoring (Galland et al, 2011).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Regarding the issue of attention and neurocognition it is recognized that intermittent hypoxia is a key pathway by which obstructive sleep apnea/ hypopnea can cause impairment ( 17 20 ). Given the fact that SpO 2 decreases as altitude increases, and that the gap is wider during sleep ( 21 ), it would be expected this impairment would be a rule in children living at significant hypoxic environments.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Este quadro torna-se evidente quando observamos um crescente diagnóstico de Déficit de Atenção e Distúrbio de Hiperatividade (DADH) em crianças, mas raramente, se imagina que este comportamento esteja relacionado à SAHOS (HENRIQUES FILHO, 2016). A associação entre distúrbios do sono e Transtorno do Déficit de Atenção e Hiperatividade (TDAH) é bastante conhecida e pode ocorrer em torno de 50-60% dos casos (NUNES; CAVALCANTE, 2005).…”
Section: Discussionunclassified