2019
DOI: 10.1242/jeb.204552
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Sexually dimorphic swim bladder extensions enhance the auditory sensitivity of female plainfin midshipman fish,Porichthys notatus

Abstract: The plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, is a seasonally breeding, nocturnal marine teleost fish that produces acoustic signals for intraspecific social communication. Females rely on audition to detect and locate 'singing' males that produce multiharmonic advertisement calls in the shallow-water, intertidal breeding environments. Previous work showed that females possess sexually dimorphic, horn-like rostral swim bladder extensions that extend toward the primary auditory end organs, the saccule and l… Show more

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Cited by 17 publications
(15 citation statements)
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“…Such extensions, also present in certain other teleost species, are hypothesized to impart sound pressure sensitivity via mechanical coupling of the swim bladder and inner ear, akin to that provided by Weberian ossicles in otophysan species (e.g. Coombs and Popper, 1979;Ramcharitar et al, 2006), which is supported by recent saccular potential measurements (Colleye et al 2019). We note that 'type II' male midshipman, an alternative male morph not considered further in the present report, also possess rostral swim bladder extensions and exhibit seasonally enhanced auditory sensitivity (see Mohr et al, 2017;Bhandiwad et al, 2017).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 67%
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“…Such extensions, also present in certain other teleost species, are hypothesized to impart sound pressure sensitivity via mechanical coupling of the swim bladder and inner ear, akin to that provided by Weberian ossicles in otophysan species (e.g. Coombs and Popper, 1979;Ramcharitar et al, 2006), which is supported by recent saccular potential measurements (Colleye et al 2019). We note that 'type II' male midshipman, an alternative male morph not considered further in the present report, also possess rostral swim bladder extensions and exhibit seasonally enhanced auditory sensitivity (see Mohr et al, 2017;Bhandiwad et al, 2017).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 67%
“…This preparation (see Materials and Methods) points to interesting possibilities for future studies of swim bladder acoustic/auditory functionality, but in the present study served chiefly to demonstrate that contributions of the swim bladder could be measured in female midshipman via the AEP paradigm we employed (cf. Colleye et al 2019, describing saccular potential measurements after swim bladder excision).…”
Section: Auditory Contributions Of the Swim Bladderimplications For Dmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These end organ differences in HC number are likely related to the end organ size of the macular area with the saccule having the largest macular area in general (note, we did not compare the macular areas of the utricle, lagena, and saccule, but the differences in end organ size visually are obvious). Not sur-prisingly, the lagena, which is the smallest end organ, is significantly less sensitive than the saccule and utricle based on HC auditory evoked potentials [Colleye et al, 2019;Vetter et al, 2019;Rogers and Sisneros, 2020]. In addition to having fewer total HCs as we report here, the lagena also has the lowest otolith mass (smallest of the three end organs) and contains an otolith (asteriscus) that is predominantly composed of lighter vaterite [Campana, 1999;Reimer et al, 2016].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 56%
“…3) that changed from vertically oriented HCs to horizontally oriented HCs that followed the macula margin in juveniles and adults. Recently Colleye et al [2019] have shown that female midshipman fish which possess sexually dimorphic rostral swim bladder extensions have enhanced auditory sensitivity to sound pressure and fre- quencies >305 Hz. The swim bladder horn-like extensions decrease the distance between the swim bladder and saccule to effectively enhance the detection of local particle motion generated by pressure-induced vibrations of the swim bladder when exposed to sound.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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