2019
DOI: 10.1242/jeb.198655
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Auditory evoked potentials of the plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus): Implications for directional hearing

Abstract: The plainfin midshipman (Porichthys notatus) is an acoustically communicative teleost fish. Here, we evaluated auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) in reproductive female midshipman exposed to tones at or near dominant frequencies of the male midshipman advertisement call. An initial series of experiments characterized AEPs at behaviorally relevant suprathreshold sound levels (130-140 dB SPL re. 1 µPa). AEPs decreased in magnitude with increasing stimulus frequency and featured a stereotyped component at twice th… Show more

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Cited by 5 publications
(6 citation statements)
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References 48 publications
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“…According to our results, the saccule was the most sensitive endorgan to noise exposure based on the higher saccular hair cell loss and synaptopathy observed. These findings agree with most literature on fish auditory systems that report saccule as the major auditory endorgan (Brown et al, 2019;Coffin et al, 2012;Ladich and Schulz-Mirbach, 2016), including in zebrafish (Brown et al, 2019;Coffin et al, 2012;Ladich and Schulz-Mirbach, 2016;Lu and DeSmidt, 2013;Smith et al, 2011). Fish species that have accessory hearing structures and improved auditory abilities, such as otophysans that include zebrafish, possess Weberian ossicles connecting the saccule to the swim bladder, which is typically correlated with higher auditory sensitivities and/or expanded hearing range (reviewed in Braun and Grande, 2008).…”
Section: Differential Role Of the Inner Ear Otolithic Endorganssupporting
confidence: 88%
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“…According to our results, the saccule was the most sensitive endorgan to noise exposure based on the higher saccular hair cell loss and synaptopathy observed. These findings agree with most literature on fish auditory systems that report saccule as the major auditory endorgan (Brown et al, 2019;Coffin et al, 2012;Ladich and Schulz-Mirbach, 2016), including in zebrafish (Brown et al, 2019;Coffin et al, 2012;Ladich and Schulz-Mirbach, 2016;Lu and DeSmidt, 2013;Smith et al, 2011). Fish species that have accessory hearing structures and improved auditory abilities, such as otophysans that include zebrafish, possess Weberian ossicles connecting the saccule to the swim bladder, which is typically correlated with higher auditory sensitivities and/or expanded hearing range (reviewed in Braun and Grande, 2008).…”
Section: Differential Role Of the Inner Ear Otolithic Endorganssupporting
confidence: 88%
“…Since field potential recordings from the zebrafish endorgans would be very difficult to perform due to the difficult access to the inner ear compared to other fish models (eg. midshipman fish, toadfish, and gobies (Brown et al, 2019;Lu et al, 2010;Vasconcelos et al, 2015), the present work provides an essential confirmation of the major sensitivity of the saccule to acoustic stimuli in the adult zebrafish.…”
Section: Differential Role Of the Inner Ear Otolithic Endorganssupporting
confidence: 71%
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“…The combination of high-resolution CT imaging and advanced biomechanics simulation tools has opened new avenues for realistically modelling the function of conductive hearing apparatus and investigating their mechanical behaviour, which is also the methodology basis of this study. Finite element methods have been extensively applied to study sound conduction of tympanic ears presented in tetrapods, with a particular focus on the human ear [45,53,54,[58][59][60][61][62][63]. Comparative studies on non-human vertebrates are still limited on cat [64], gerbil [65], chickens [66], mallard [67], whale [68] and mouse [69,70].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Finite element methods have been extensively applied to study sound conduction of tympanic ears presented in tetrapods, with a particular focus on the human ear [ 45 , 53 , 54 , 58 63 ]. Comparative studies on non-human vertebrates are still limited on cat [ 64 ], gerbil [ 65 ], chickens [ 66 ], mallard [ 67 ], whale [ 68 ] and mouse [ 69 , 70 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%