2013
DOI: 10.3390/jpm3010023
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Abstract: Sensors have become ubiquitous in their reach and scope of application. They are a technological cornerstone for various modes of health surveillance and participatory medicine—such as quantifying oneself; they are also employed to track people with certain as impairments perceived ability differences. This paper presents quantitative and qualitative data of an exploratory, non-generalizable study into the perceptions, attitudes and concerns of staff of a disability service organization, that mostly serve peop… Show more

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Cited by 17 publications
(17 citation statements)
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“…In our case, the clients of the staff of the disability service organization are cognitive impaired people who are seen as more vulnerable due to their state of cognitive abilities. The staff of the same organization, when asked about sensors, where highlighting the lack of control they felt their clients already have over their daily life [54] and they believe that more complicated machines could not be understood by their client. This sentiment would be a barrier to uptake of the social robots as the cognitive impaired person would be seen as having no way to rectify a 'bad' action by the robot.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In our case, the clients of the staff of the disability service organization are cognitive impaired people who are seen as more vulnerable due to their state of cognitive abilities. The staff of the same organization, when asked about sensors, where highlighting the lack of control they felt their clients already have over their daily life [54] and they believe that more complicated machines could not be understood by their client. This sentiment would be a barrier to uptake of the social robots as the cognitive impaired person would be seen as having no way to rectify a 'bad' action by the robot.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, these devices and robots raise ethical concerns pertaining to the ability of people with impairments to fully understand use of the devices, which in turn raises potential for invasions of privacy [6,24]. And what about instances where people may understand but not agree to terms of use?…”
Section: Living In An Age Of Health Support From the Convenience Of Homementioning
confidence: 99%
“…For example, the User Acceptance of Information Technology (UTAUT) model [ 272 , 273 ] may serve. This model was applied previously to evaluate smart wearable devices [ 274 ], including health care [ 275 , 276 ], and m-health devices [ 277 ]. Other parameters, such as size or weight, can also affect the adoption of the technology.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%