2003
DOI: 10.1590/s1516-89132003000400024
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Abstract: Thirteen understorey species of a mesophyllous tropical forest were studied under two different photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD). Seedlings were grown in the glasshouse under 51% and 2.6% solar PPFD. Growth of the seedlings was evaluated by 1-) total height; 2-) leaf number; 3-) leaf dry mass;4-) stem dry mass; 5-) root dry mass; 6-) stem length/mass; 7-)shoot/root mass; 8-) percent allocation to leaf, stem and roots. For most of the parameters recorded, low PPFD drastically reduced growth. It seeme… Show more

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Cited by 9 publications
(9 citation statements)
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“…Jones et al (1997) highlighted that each canopy tree species is a physical ecosystem engineer that creates many specific abiotic conditions beneath its crown, like specific litter accumulation, soil composition, allelochemical compounds composition, among others (for details see Zinke, 1962;Lodhi, 1977;Binkley, 1995;Denslow, 1996;Carnevale & Montagnini, 2002). Many authors have shown that such different conditions can affect germination, seed predation, pathogens attacks, tolerance, and herbivory in a species-specific way (Chou & Yang, 1982;Denslow, 1996;Cintra, 1997;Wardle & Lavelle, 1997;Metcalfe & Turner, 1998;Nicotra et al, 1999;Van Oijen et al, 2005). These species-specific biological responses can result in the selection of specific communities of seedlings, soil fauna, bacteria, micorrhiza, and pathogens composition (e.g., see Boettcher & Kalisz, 1990, Dobson & Crawley, 1994Denslow, 1996;Cintra, 1997;Ettema & Wardle, 2002).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Jones et al (1997) highlighted that each canopy tree species is a physical ecosystem engineer that creates many specific abiotic conditions beneath its crown, like specific litter accumulation, soil composition, allelochemical compounds composition, among others (for details see Zinke, 1962;Lodhi, 1977;Binkley, 1995;Denslow, 1996;Carnevale & Montagnini, 2002). Many authors have shown that such different conditions can affect germination, seed predation, pathogens attacks, tolerance, and herbivory in a species-specific way (Chou & Yang, 1982;Denslow, 1996;Cintra, 1997;Wardle & Lavelle, 1997;Metcalfe & Turner, 1998;Nicotra et al, 1999;Van Oijen et al, 2005). These species-specific biological responses can result in the selection of specific communities of seedlings, soil fauna, bacteria, micorrhiza, and pathogens composition (e.g., see Boettcher & Kalisz, 1990, Dobson & Crawley, 1994Denslow, 1996;Cintra, 1997;Ettema & Wardle, 2002).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The only variable that differed between the two environments studied was the canopy openness, which in this case represents the amount of light available to plants occurring in the understory. Since the species respond differently to the light intensities received (Souza and Valio, 2001;Valio, 2003), the light availability seems to be the ecological filter to determine the flora of each vegetation type. Considering that typical endemic Cerrado species are on the most heliophytic (Eiten, 1972;Goodland and Ferri, 1979;Franco, 2005), the shading becomes a limiting factor for the development of these species (Larcher, 2000;Lemos Filho et al, 2010).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Even though rainfall pattern is often considered the most prominent physical factor marking seasonal variations in the tropics (Stubblebine et al, 1978), the growth of tropical species can be also directly influenced by light quantity and quality, with the response varying among species (Souza and Válio, 2003;Válio, 2003) due to exogenous and endogenous factors acting concomitantly (Thomas and Vince-Prue, 1997). Caesalpinia echinata is commonly found inside the forest where there is a reduction in the red:far-red ratio and in the photon flux density, being considered a climax or a late-secondary species (Carvalho, 1994;Cardoso et al, 1998) and shade-tolerant.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%