2016
DOI: 10.1590/1809-43412016v13n1p022 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: SummaryThis paper examines how certain assumptions concerning sexual behaviour, race and nationality emerge at the core of explanations regarding the origin of HIV. In particular, it returns to discussions of the so-called "AIDS debate" in South Africa in the 2000s. On the one hand, it focuses on how these assumptions reinforce the understanding of AIDS as stigma and "social problem", to the extent that they emphasise the existence of geographical areas and "risk groups". On the other, these same assumptions a… Show more

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“…Stigmatized people usually keep away from society and even themselves for discrediting a world that does not embrace them. (22) When they seek socialization, they look for groups of people that share the same stigmatized treatment to increase the chances of acceptance, and even in this situation they can oscillate between approach and withdrawing. Another common reaction is to try to prove healthy people that they can be equals, trying to overcome limits, participating in sports championships and activities that reveal their talents.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning