2016
DOI: 10.3390/beverages2040030
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Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the Production of Fermented Beverages

Abstract: Alcoholic beverages are produced following the fermentation of sugars by yeasts, mainly (but not exclusively) strains of the species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The sugary starting materials may emanate from cereal starches (which require enzymatic pre-hydrolysis) in the case of beers and whiskies, sucrose-rich plants (molasses or sugar juice from sugarcane) in the case of rums, or from fruits (which do not require pre-hydrolysis) in the case of wines and brandies. In the presence of sugars, together with other… Show more

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Cited by 269 publications
(183 citation statements)
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“…For example, S. cerevisiae cannot fix atmospheric nitrogen and requires the supply of organic nitrogen (amino acids) or inorganic nitrogen (ammonium salts). Next to nitrogen sources, minerals, and especially key metal ions, are important determinants of yeast performance (Walker and Stewart 2016 impact on yeasts during brewing and distilling fermentations. For example, increasing free Mg 2+ in fermentation media increased alcohol production, while maintaining high Mg 2+ :Ca 2+ ratios in fermentation feedstocks is important for maximal fermentation performance (Walker and others 2006).…”
Section: Vitamins Minerals and Amino Acidsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For example, S. cerevisiae cannot fix atmospheric nitrogen and requires the supply of organic nitrogen (amino acids) or inorganic nitrogen (ammonium salts). Next to nitrogen sources, minerals, and especially key metal ions, are important determinants of yeast performance (Walker and Stewart 2016 impact on yeasts during brewing and distilling fermentations. For example, increasing free Mg 2+ in fermentation media increased alcohol production, while maintaining high Mg 2+ :Ca 2+ ratios in fermentation feedstocks is important for maximal fermentation performance (Walker and others 2006).…”
Section: Vitamins Minerals and Amino Acidsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Common consortia harbor yeasts, acetic acid, and lactic acid bacteria [34]. The diversity in carbon metabolism pathways among the different microbes in the consortia, allows mixed culture fermentation towards the production of different primary and secondary metabolites that influence the overall aromatic complexity of the alcoholic beverage [65][66][67]. Such mixed culture fermentation has become common in the wine and beer industries in an effort to improve the distinctive flavors of the alcoholic beverages.…”
Section: Advancements In Fermentation Strategiesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Grapes for example, harbor a number of fermenting yeasts on their skins such as Kloeckera spp., Hanseniaspora spp., Candida spp., Pichia spp., Kluyveromyce spp., Metschnikowia spp., and Cryptococcus spp. [67,70,71] with Hanseniaspora uvarum, Pichia terricola, and Metschnikowia pulcherrima being the three most representative species isolated to date [69]. The most well-known and best fermenting yeast, S. cerevisiae, however, is found in very low frequencies on some fruits such as the grape skins, and in vineyards soils [72].…”
Section: Yeastsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Yeasts, especially Saccharomyces species, are generally chosen for the production of ethanol due to an important fermentation capacity, a good tolerance to ethanol and other inhibitors, and their capability of rapid growth under anaerobic conditions which are characteristic of fermentation processes [10,11].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%