2011
DOI: 10.1590/s1984-29612011000400009
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Rickettsia species infecting Amblyomma ticks from an area endemic for Brazilian spotted fever in Brazil

Abstract: This study reports rickettsial infection in Amblyomma cajennense and Amblyomma dubitatum ticks collected in an area of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, where Brazilian spotted fever is considered endemic. For this purpose, 400 adults of A. cajenennse and 200 adults of A. dubitatum, plus 2,000 larvae and 2,000 nymphs of Amblyomma spp. were collected from horses and from the vegetation. The ticks were tested for rickettsial infection through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocols targeting portions of three… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1
1

Citation Types

5
22
0
3

Year Published

2013
2013
2024
2024

Publication Types

Select...
10

Relationship

1
9

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 33 publications
(30 citation statements)
references
References 20 publications
(30 reference statements)
5
22
0
3
Order By: Relevance
“…In this scenario, the average fraction of infected detached larvae is 1.25% (95% CI = 0%-7.04%), infected attached larvae 0.7% (95% CI = 0%-6.5%), infected detached nymphs 1.35% (95% CI = 0%-9.36%), infected attached nymphs 0.8% (95% CI = 0%-6.95%), infected detached adults 0.46% (95% CI = 0%-5.17%) and infected attached adults 0.54% (95% CI = 0%-5.64%). These results are consistent with previous observations in BSF-endemic areas in which the fraction of infected A. sculptum adults attached to horses has been reported at 0% [28] and the fraction of infected detached adults A. sculptum at 1% (95% CI = 0.01%-7.8%) [28], 0.2% (95% CI = 0.01%-1.04%) [10] and 1.28% (95% CI = 0.07%-5.59%) [29]. The fraction of infected capybaras and other tick populations remains unreported.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 93%
“…In this scenario, the average fraction of infected detached larvae is 1.25% (95% CI = 0%-7.04%), infected attached larvae 0.7% (95% CI = 0%-6.5%), infected detached nymphs 1.35% (95% CI = 0%-9.36%), infected attached nymphs 0.8% (95% CI = 0%-6.95%), infected detached adults 0.46% (95% CI = 0%-5.17%) and infected attached adults 0.54% (95% CI = 0%-5.64%). These results are consistent with previous observations in BSF-endemic areas in which the fraction of infected A. sculptum adults attached to horses has been reported at 0% [28] and the fraction of infected detached adults A. sculptum at 1% (95% CI = 0.01%-7.8%) [28], 0.2% (95% CI = 0.01%-1.04%) [10] and 1.28% (95% CI = 0.07%-5.59%) [29]. The fraction of infected capybaras and other tick populations remains unreported.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 93%
“…When nymphs derived from engorged larvae that had fed with R. rickettsii IN within the same chamber (UL + IN), absence of rickettsial transmission was demonstrated in 4 guinea pigs (nos. 24, 25, 28, 29), whereas rickettsial transmission was demonstrated by fever and seroconversion in 2 guinea pigs (nos. 26, 27).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The Pampulha strain, recently reported in A. dubitatum ticks in Brazil (201)(202)(203), and the Colombianensi strain, reported in Amblyomma dissimile and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus ticks in Colombia (204), are two distinct strains that are closely related to the Old World species Rickettsia tamurae and Rickettsia monacensis. In Brazil, only a few populations of A. dubitatum have been found to be infected by the Pampulha strain; however, infection rates are usually very high among the infected populations (203).…”
Section: South Americamentioning
confidence: 99%