2014
DOI: 10.1590/fst.2014.0039
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Resistant starch in cassava products

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Cited by 26 publications
(15 citation statements)
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“…Initially developed for cereals, the method has found success in the determination of resistant starch fractions in other feed ingredients such as cassava or square banana meals (Table 3) or, as stated above, in silages. The resistant starch fraction found in cassava flour (0.019 ± 0.03 which represent 16.74 g/kg) this concurs with data reported previously [15] ranging from 0.19 to 2.21 g/100 g. Total starch for the square banana meal was calculated to be (71.81 ± 1.05) g/100 g; starch is considered to be the major constituent in unripe green banana [16] resistant starch percentages as high as 54% have been reported for square banana [17].…”
Section: Methods Detailssupporting
confidence: 93%
“…Initially developed for cereals, the method has found success in the determination of resistant starch fractions in other feed ingredients such as cassava or square banana meals (Table 3) or, as stated above, in silages. The resistant starch fraction found in cassava flour (0.019 ± 0.03 which represent 16.74 g/kg) this concurs with data reported previously [15] ranging from 0.19 to 2.21 g/100 g. Total starch for the square banana meal was calculated to be (71.81 ± 1.05) g/100 g; starch is considered to be the major constituent in unripe green banana [16] resistant starch percentages as high as 54% have been reported for square banana [17].…”
Section: Methods Detailssupporting
confidence: 93%
“…We concluded that the MW roasting process decreased the level of resistant starch compared to unroasted hazelnuts at all the roasting conditions, whereas using the MW-assisted hot air roasting process increased the level of resistant starch compared to that of unroasted hazelnuts at some roasting conditions and caused a smaller reduction than the MW roasting process. In this context, as reported by Pereira and Leonel ( 23 ), food processing techniques including sterilizing, drying in ovens, or drying at high temperatures increases the level of resistant starch ( 24 ). A study supporting our results also reported that the level of resistant starch of chickpeas and beans decreased with application of a thermal treatment by MW ( 25 ).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 92%
“…The combined information provides evidence suggesting that ancient immature and thus smaller starches do not survive taphonomic processes as often as mature and larger (resistant) starches. This idea is similar to how some species are naturally more resistant to enzyme digestion (Hutschenreuther, et al, 2017), and may be similar to how some resistant starches survive the human digestive process better than others (Pereira and Leonel, 2014). As Piperno (2006:58) states, "size alone does not universally separate wild from domesticated Manihot".…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 93%