2021
DOI: 10.1080/09557571.2021.1944983
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Republican internationalism: the nineteenth-century roots of Latin American contributions to international order

Abstract: Although Latin America plays a minimal role in debates on the 'liberal international order', scholars recognize the region's influence on international law, norms, and institutions. We contend that these Latin American contributions to international order spring from a tradition of 'republican internationalism', rooted in the region's domestic political traditions and practices. Republican principles such as the separation of power, association, and the rule of law had important corollaries in Latin American i… Show more

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Cited by 9 publications
(4 citation statements)
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“…Reversing the gaze starts with the broader recognition that democracy has long been a global experiment. The historical role played by various regions of the world in shaping contemporary international law, norms and institutions remains to be studied in depth (Long and Schulz, 2022). Fast forwarding to the 21st century, we offer a few examples of where some of the most productive influences from Europe's ‘elsewhere’ might lie.…”
Section: Lessons From Elsewherementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Reversing the gaze starts with the broader recognition that democracy has long been a global experiment. The historical role played by various regions of the world in shaping contemporary international law, norms and institutions remains to be studied in depth (Long and Schulz, 2022). Fast forwarding to the 21st century, we offer a few examples of where some of the most productive influences from Europe's ‘elsewhere’ might lie.…”
Section: Lessons From Elsewherementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Diplomatic efforts were focused on securing recognition of their independence, defining territorial borders, and establishing diplomatic relations with other countries. The region defended a tradition of republican internationalism, led by figures like Simón Bolívar, Andrés Bello, and José María Samper, to protect newly independent and vulnerable states from Iberian colonial domination (Long & Schulz, 2022). Post-World War II, Latin American governments participated actively in the establishment of the United Nations (UN), displaying significant presence during the 1945 San Francisco Conference and the formulation of the UN Charter, thus fostering the Westphalian narrative supported by international recognition of sovereignty principles (Fajardo, 2021).…”
Section: The Practical Perspective Part I: Latin American Diplomacy A...mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Still, it is essential to underscore the existence of noteworthy literature in this regard. Many studies concentrate on post-WWII Latin American engagements with the international order, with early research by Fajardo (2021), Long (2020), Rodriguez and Thornton (2022), Sikkink (2014), and Thornton (2022), while others explore primarily pre-WWII Latin American interactions with the international order, such as Finnemore and Jurkovich (2014), Long and Schulz (2022), and Scarfi (2022). Much of the literature centers on Latin American civil society organizations and social movements, which have significantly contributed to promoting global normative frameworks, particularly in areas like gender, social, environmental, and intercultural justice (Keck & Sikkink, 1998;Lorca, 2023;Pousadela, 2013Pousadela, , 2019.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Finnemore and Jurkovich 2014;Scott 1926;Yepes 1955. 60. de la Reza 2000Long and Schulz 2021. geographically universal and were marked by an emphasis on arbitration, an aspiration for greater commerce, and a tendency toward legalization. While the Americas had a multifaceted diplomatic agenda, none of this was well institutionalized.…”
Section: From Conference To Bureaumentioning
confidence: 99%