2014
DOI: 10.1080/23269995.2014.954889
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Recognition, conflict and the problem of ethical community

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Cited by 10 publications
(6 citation statements)
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References 45 publications
(22 reference statements)
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“…Since then, scholarship about international recognition has exploded. It includes, but is not limited to, a broad survey from legal, political, sociological, and moral perspectives (Agné et al 2013), a journal special issue (Brincat 2014), and an edited volume (Daase et al 2015). In February 2015, at the annual convention of the International Studies Association, I counted as many as 14 papers and one roundtable dedicated to the topic.…”
Section: The Lay Of the Landmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Since then, scholarship about international recognition has exploded. It includes, but is not limited to, a broad survey from legal, political, sociological, and moral perspectives (Agné et al 2013), a journal special issue (Brincat 2014), and an edited volume (Daase et al 2015). In February 2015, at the annual convention of the International Studies Association, I counted as many as 14 papers and one roundtable dedicated to the topic.…”
Section: The Lay Of the Landmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…It includes, but is not limited to, a broad survey from legal, political, sociological, and moral perspectives (Agné et al . 2013), a journal special issue (Brincat 2014), and an edited volume (Daase et al . 2015).…”
Section: The Lay Of the Landmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In other words, rather than involving mutuality and genuine acceptance of the other, these were largely policies of assimilation seeking to 'normalise the other by reducing them to oneself'. 102 Neither did they correspond to the normative ideal of recognition in terms of causal mechanisms, as they were mostly driven by instrumental rationality. It is here that the transnational connection comes into play.…”
Section: Thin Cognitive Recognition From the Annexing State And The Imentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Non-recognition, which implies a negation of identity and status of states, gives rise to different treatment. 41 From the view of unrecognized entities, non-recognition can be perceived as an act of misrecognition premised on injustice and disrespect. 42 Both IR and legal academics understand the legal principle of non-recognition in a similar way.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%