2011
DOI: 10.1002/trtr.01026
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Reading Pictures: Developing Visual Literacy for Greater Comprehension

Abstract: Picturebooks tell stories in both words and pictures. Interacting with the printed word, the technical elements of illustration – color, line, shape and composition – work to establish and enhance the story. Sometimes simply by adding description of characters and setting, and, at times, by challenging the veracity of the text with ironic or additional information, the illustrations in picturebooks provide essential clues for comprehension. However, like any semiotic system, the elements of illustration have c… Show more

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Cited by 59 publications
(52 citation statements)
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References 8 publications
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“…It also prepares them to deal with the images and messages of popular culture more thoughtfully and critically. Others have provided evidence to support the claim that the ability to “read pictures” has a positive effect on both children's overall reading comprehension (O'Neil, ) and their ability to communicate meaning through art (Martens, Martens, Doyle, Loomis, & Aghalarov, ).…”
Section: Transmediationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…It also prepares them to deal with the images and messages of popular culture more thoughtfully and critically. Others have provided evidence to support the claim that the ability to “read pictures” has a positive effect on both children's overall reading comprehension (O'Neil, ) and their ability to communicate meaning through art (Martens, Martens, Doyle, Loomis, & Aghalarov, ).…”
Section: Transmediationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Filmmakers use images, color, music, and camerawork to tell stories, much the same way picturebook illustrators use color, line, medium, typography, and composition. Although analyzing visual elements is an important aspect of critical media literacy, too often these activities are ignored in the classroom, as is the case with picturebooks, where the focus tends to be on analyzing written language rather than artistic elements (Nodelman, 1988;O'Neil, 2011;Serafini, 2009). In picturebooks, illustrations "exist primarily so that they can assist in the telling of stories" (Nodelman, 1988, p. ix); therefore, they are critical for story comprehension (Sipe, 1998).…”
Section: Filmmakers As Storytellers: the Language Of Filmmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…According to some researchers, postmodern picture books can also be used in the teaching of visual literacy. Teaching then directs attention to the use of, for example, framing, lines and colours in the picture book as well as the different proportions of the text (see for example O'Neil, 2011;Serafini, 2010;Serafini & Gee, 2014;Stafford, 2011;Unsworth, 2006). In addition to picture books, teaching can also make use of graphic novels (Wolfen & Kleijwegtin, 2012).…”
Section: Visual Literacymentioning
confidence: 99%