2011
DOI: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2010.00311.x
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Abstract: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine-threonine kinase that controls global protein synthesis, in part, by modulating translation initiation, a rate-limiting step for many mRNAs. Previous studies implicate mTOR in regulating stimulant-induced sensitization and antidepressive-like behavior in rodents, as well as drug craving in abstinent heroin addicts. To determine if signaling downstream of mTOR is affected by repeated cocaine administration in reward-associated brain regions, and if inhibition… Show more

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Cited by 50 publications
(54 citation statements)
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References 46 publications
(54 reference statements)
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“…Several studies have reported that rapamycin can inhibit drug-seeking in animals and drug-craving in humans after withdrawal. On the other hand, memory retrieval is usually completely impaired by protein synthesis inhibitors (Shi et al, 2009;Neasta et al, 2010;Wang et al, 2010;Bailey et al, 2012;Dayas et al, 2012). Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR, frequently used in organ transplantation to prevent rejection via the inhibition of protein synthesis, can successfully enter the brain in rats and humans.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Several studies have reported that rapamycin can inhibit drug-seeking in animals and drug-craving in humans after withdrawal. On the other hand, memory retrieval is usually completely impaired by protein synthesis inhibitors (Shi et al, 2009;Neasta et al, 2010;Wang et al, 2010;Bailey et al, 2012;Dayas et al, 2012). Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR, frequently used in organ transplantation to prevent rejection via the inhibition of protein synthesis, can successfully enter the brain in rats and humans.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Both acute systemic and intra-NAC injections of rapamycin attenuated alcohol-drinking behaviors and conditioned place preference (CPP) for alcohol (Neasta et al, 2010). Acute systemic rapamycin treatment also suppressed the expression of cocaine CPP, behavioral sensitization to cocaine (Bailey et al, 2012), and the sensitization of meth-amphetamine CPP (Narita et al, 2005). These findings indicate that mTORC1 may have a role in controlling the processes responsible for the strengthening of drug/cue associations.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 69%
“…rapamycin reduced lever pressing for cocaine when PR conditions were required to obtain cocaine infusions. To date, data supporting the role for mTORC1 in psychostimulant reinforcement has been limited to CPP and sensitization studies (Bailey et al, 2012;Narita et al, 2005). However, mTORC1 inhibition has been reported to reduce low-effort alcohol drinking in mice and FR1 alcohol self-administration in rats (Neasta et al, 2010).…”
Section: Intra-cerebroventricular Mtorc1 Inhibition Reduces Pr Responmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…One striking conclusion from these studies is that mTORC1 signaling is acutely involved in behavioral or synaptic phenomena that are observed long after exposure to a drug of abuse. For example, in mice trained in a cocaine-based conditioned place preference (CPP) task, daily systemic injections of rapamycin did not interfere with the acquisition of CPP (Bailey et al 2012 ). However, when these mice were tested 2 days after training, an injection of rapamycin 1 h before the test interfered with CPP performance.…”
Section: Mtor Signaling In Models Of Drug Addictionmentioning
confidence: 96%