2007
DOI: 10.1590/s0100-879x2006005000144
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Racial inequalities and perinatal health in the southeast region of Brazil

Abstract: Few studies are available about racial inequalities in perinatal health in Brazil and little is known about whether the existing inequality is due to socioeconomic factors or to racial discrimination per se. Data regarding the Ribeirão Preto birth cohort, Brazil, whose mothers were interviewed from June 1, 1978 to May 31, 1979 were used to answer these questions. The perinatal factors were obtained from the birth questionnaire and the ethnic data were obtained from 2063 participants asked about self-reported s… Show more

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Cited by 25 publications
(21 citation statements)
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“…With respect to income, although there was a difference, it was small as expected since women in this group are more affl uent. The negative association between cesarean delivery and skin color has been described in other studies, 10,21 and for other child and mother outcomes, 3,13,20 and is explained by poor quality of prenatal care and socioeconomic disadvantages. However, it should be noted that it remains a factor in the model that exclusively analyzed the private sector, even after adjustment for income.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 62%
“…With respect to income, although there was a difference, it was small as expected since women in this group are more affl uent. The negative association between cesarean delivery and skin color has been described in other studies, 10,21 and for other child and mother outcomes, 3,13,20 and is explained by poor quality of prenatal care and socioeconomic disadvantages. However, it should be noted that it remains a factor in the model that exclusively analyzed the private sector, even after adjustment for income.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 62%
“…Although errors of hetero-classification may not be completely discarded, the change in the ethnic profile of the pregnant population may impact unfavorably the prevalence of low-birthweight, pre-term, and small-for-gestational age babies 18 .…”
Section: Variablementioning
confidence: 99%
“…The disparities we find are consistent with those from other studies in Brazil. (35,65) For example, Barros et al report a 14-24% increased likelihood of LBW and PTB among non-white infants compared to white infants in Southern Brazil. (35) However, our study is the first to formally decompose these disparities in Brazil and quantify how they relate to demographic, socioeconomic, healthcare, and geographic differences.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…(37,41,57,58,63) Notable disparities in the number and quality of prenatal care visits exist between white and black/mixed race women in Brazil. (5,6,64,65) Demographic characteristics include a binary indicator for infant sex, continuous maternal and paternal age variables, and age squared. In addition to their direct effects on infant health (especially in the case of infant's sex and maternal age), these characteristics also influence parental health preferences and behaviors.…”
Section: Study Measures and Empirical Modelmentioning
confidence: 99%