2011
DOI: 10.1590/s0037-86822011000500011
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Production of anti-Cryptosporidium polyclonal antibodies and standardization of direct immunofluorescence for detecting oocysts in water

Abstract: INTRODUCTION: The production of anti-Cryptosporidium polyclonal antibodies and its use in direct immunofluorescence assays to determine the presence of Cryptosporidium in water are described in the present work. METHODS: Two rabbits were immunized with soluble and particulate antigens from purified Cryptosporidium oocysts. The sera produced were prepared for immunoglobulin G extraction, which were then purified and conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). Slides containing known amounts of oo… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1

Citation Types

0
2
0

Year Published

2013
2013
2018
2018

Publication Types

Select...
2

Relationship

1
1

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 2 publications
(2 citation statements)
references
References 8 publications
0
2
0
Order By: Relevance
“…Antibodies have also been made against specific proteins ( 15 , 17 , 18 ); however, this method of antibody production does not typically allow for the discovery of novel antigens. Additionally, many antibodies previously raised against Cryptosporidium were made in rabbits ( 15 , 18 , 19 ), which is a nonrenewable source of antibody. Collectively, these available reagents do not allow the specific life cycle stages to be clearly delineated with unique markers, confounding attempts to track development during in vitro growth.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Antibodies have also been made against specific proteins ( 15 , 17 , 18 ); however, this method of antibody production does not typically allow for the discovery of novel antigens. Additionally, many antibodies previously raised against Cryptosporidium were made in rabbits ( 15 , 18 , 19 ), which is a nonrenewable source of antibody. Collectively, these available reagents do not allow the specific life cycle stages to be clearly delineated with unique markers, confounding attempts to track development during in vitro growth.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Current techniques for the environmental detection of Cryptosporidium require the fi ltration of large volumes, elution, isolation, and enumeration of the oocysts by immunofl uorescent microscopy 10,29 . However, this approach cannot determine whether Cryptosporidium oocysts are viable or whether they belong to a human-infective genotype.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%