2013
DOI: 10.1590/s1676-06032013000100016
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Predation on artificial nests in open habitats of central Brazil: effects of time and egg size

Abstract: Abstract:The accuracy of artificial nests in representing natural patterns of nest predation has been widely studied in temperate regions and egg size is one of the most tested sources of bias. In the neotropics, experiments with artificial nests usually used larger than natural eggs, despite suggestions in literature that the eggs should be similar to those of the local species. Here, we tested the hypothesis of spatial-temporal variation in predation risk of artificial nests in relation to egg size. We used … Show more

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Cited by 5 publications
(5 citation statements)
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“…We found no significant differences in predation rates in relation to egg size. This finding differs from most studies that have used small eggs, which generally showed that small eggs were predated more than large ones (Oliveira et al 2013, Coppedge et al 2007, Davison & Bollinger 2000, possibly due to the presence of small predators. In this study, the nest predation rate was the same for both egg sizes, which could be due to a greater presence of birds capable of eating quail eggs.…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 99%
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“…We found no significant differences in predation rates in relation to egg size. This finding differs from most studies that have used small eggs, which generally showed that small eggs were predated more than large ones (Oliveira et al 2013, Coppedge et al 2007, Davison & Bollinger 2000, possibly due to the presence of small predators. In this study, the nest predation rate was the same for both egg sizes, which could be due to a greater presence of birds capable of eating quail eggs.…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 99%
“…Furthermore, the direct observation of a natural nest predation event is rare and the presence of the observer can dissuade predators. Instead, nest predation rates can be estimated using artificial nests containing natural and/or artificial eggs of different types (Oliveira et al 2013, Montevecchi 1976, Lindell 2000. However, the size and shell thickness of eggs used in nest predation studies can affect predation frequency as well as the predator species detected (Maier & DeGraaf 2000, Roper 1992, Haskell 1995, Oliveira et al 2013.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…It seems birds have a high nesting success in this region or this might be attributed to the use of artificial nests, as quail eggs used in our study and chicken eggs used in Bobo and Waltert () are bigger than the common passerine eggs in the region, and therefore not accessible to small‐mouthed predators (Degraaf & Maier , Oliveira et al . ). Also, artificial nests do not smell like real nests to the predators, which might lower their attractiveness to the predators (Whelan et al .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…Quail eggs are larger than canary eggs and have a thicker shell. These put their contents out of reach for smallmouthed predators (Degraaf & Maier 1996, Oliveira et al 2013. Also, the longer forest gradient (30 m asl to 2906 m) in Boyle (2008) compared to Mt.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%