2014
DOI: 10.1590/s1984-46702014000300002
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Population biology of Aegla platensis (Decapoda: Anomura: Aeglidae) in a tributary of the Uruguay River, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Abstract: ABSTRACT. Aeglids are freshwater anomurans that are endemic from southern South America. While their population biology at the species-level is relatively well understood, intraspecific variation within populations has been poorly investigated. Our goal was to investigate the population biology of Aegla platensis Schmitt, 1942 from the Uruguay River Basin, and compare our data with data from other populations. We estimated biometric data, sex ratio, population density and size-class frequencies, and frequencie… Show more

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Cited by 8 publications
(12 citation statements)
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References 33 publications
(39 reference statements)
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“…Females or juveniles would not enter the traps to avoid agonistic encounters with the larger males (Trevisan and Santos, 2014). Similar to this study, Dalosto et al (2014) also found that individuals were significantly greater in size in trap captures than in handnet captures. Furthermore, sexual dimorphism, with males larger than females (CL, CW, AW, LSQ, LMQ, and HMQ), was verified for grouped data and trap captures, but not for handnet capture ( Table 2).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 85%
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“…Females or juveniles would not enter the traps to avoid agonistic encounters with the larger males (Trevisan and Santos, 2014). Similar to this study, Dalosto et al (2014) also found that individuals were significantly greater in size in trap captures than in handnet captures. Furthermore, sexual dimorphism, with males larger than females (CL, CW, AW, LSQ, LMQ, and HMQ), was verified for grouped data and trap captures, but not for handnet capture ( Table 2).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 85%
“…Other studies on the size of male and female aeglids are also possibly influenced by the capture method (Table 4), which demonstrates the importance of considering the capture method in the evaluation of sexual dimorphism. Similar to this current study, Dalosto et al (2014) compared the use of traps with handnets and also found that the males were significantly greater in size than the females only in the trap captures.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 82%
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