2017
DOI: 10.5897/ajmr2016.7942
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Abstract: Coffee husk is a residue generated in large amount in Brazil and which contains caffeine and tannins, among other compounds, resulting in disposal problem. Recently, studies have shown that coffee husk can be used as substrate for mushroom cultivation. However, the main problem seems to be a low mushroom yield. Moreover, sterilization was always performed, making difficult the mushroom cultivation dissemination in deprived regions. Here, the viability of alternative methods was evaluated using lime immersion a… Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(1 citation statement)
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“…Thus, it is of special importance for Ethiopia to make use of coffee husks for value addition, disposing of coffee waste and reducing environmental pollution. Currently, research on the reuse of coffee husks is mainly focused on the production of ethanol (Franca et al, 2008), activated carbon (Ahmad and Rahman, 2011; Hernández Rodiguez et al, 2018), mushrooms (Mateus et al, 2017) and biogas (Passos et al, 2018). Franca et al (2008) obtained ethanol production of 8.49 ± 0.29 g per 100 g dry under the condition of 30°C, 3 g yeast l −1 substrate, indicating that coffee husks exhibited excellent potential for ethanol production (Franca et al, 2008).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Thus, it is of special importance for Ethiopia to make use of coffee husks for value addition, disposing of coffee waste and reducing environmental pollution. Currently, research on the reuse of coffee husks is mainly focused on the production of ethanol (Franca et al, 2008), activated carbon (Ahmad and Rahman, 2011; Hernández Rodiguez et al, 2018), mushrooms (Mateus et al, 2017) and biogas (Passos et al, 2018). Franca et al (2008) obtained ethanol production of 8.49 ± 0.29 g per 100 g dry under the condition of 30°C, 3 g yeast l −1 substrate, indicating that coffee husks exhibited excellent potential for ethanol production (Franca et al, 2008).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%