2017
DOI: 10.21005/asp.2017.16.3.04
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Physiological parameters in broiler chickens reared under different housing systems during a period of high temperatures

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Cited by 6 publications
(4 citation statements)
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“…One of the body's responses to high ambient temperature is an increase in the body's radiation temperature (Skomorucha and Sosnówka-Czajka, 2017;Cândido et al, 2020).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…One of the body's responses to high ambient temperature is an increase in the body's radiation temperature (Skomorucha and Sosnówka-Czajka, 2017;Cândido et al, 2020).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…According to Olanrewaju et al (2010), the body temperature of an adult chicken is 40.6 to 41.7°C, and the thermoneutral zone that allows chickens to maintain their body temperature is 18 to 24°C. When birds are exposed to temperatures above their thermoneutral zone, heat exchange between the bird and its environment is impeded, which is reflected in altered physiological and metabolic reactions such as: endocrine disruption (Jiang et al, 2020), electrolyte imbalance (Attia et al, 2011), elevated body temperature (Giloh et al, 2012;Skomorucha and Sosnówka-Czajka, 2017;Vermette et al, 2017), increased heterophil to lymphocyte ratio (Vermette et al, 2017), immunosuppression (Xu et al, 2018), oxidative stress (Song et al, 2018), behavioural changes (Olanrewaju et al, 2010;Lara and Rostagno, 2013) and compromised productivity and meat quality (Olanrewaju et al, 2010;Saeed et al, 2019). According to many authors, high ambient temperatures cause substantial economic losses due to reduced weight gains and increased mortality of the birds (Wang et al, 2018;Saeed et al, 2019;Jiang et al, 2020).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…In addition, Dikmen et al (2016) noted a lower H:L ratio in free-range hens compared to caged hens, but the birds from these systems showed a similar TI duration. Skomorucha and Sosnówka-Czajka (2017) found the level of stress to decrease, as reflected in lower glucose and corticosterone concentrations in birds with free-range access; this may suggest the higher welfare status of free-range poultry compared to birds kept in the barn system. Lower blood glucose levels in free-range birds were also reported by Gunes et al (2002) and Rehman et al (2017).…”
Section: Free-range Systemmentioning
confidence: 90%