2019
DOI: 10.3389/feduc.2019.00105
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Physical Activity and Cognition: Inseparable in the Classroom

Abstract: Traditional education has tended to compartmentalize abstract thought, emotion, and physical activity. However, neuroscientific evidence suggests that these are completely interlinked in the learning process. The traditional lecture-style lesson relegates students to a passive and sedentary role, precluding physical movement. In addition, the current trend of schools reducing recess hours, dropping physical education classes, or subjects that involve the whole body-theater, music, outdoor activity-further limi… Show more

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Cited by 23 publications
(17 citation statements)
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References 64 publications
(102 reference statements)
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“…As previously mentioned in the introduction, research examining the effects of cognitively engaging physical activity and the integration of academic learning material alongside physical activity has been gaining significant interest. Various physiological and cognitive mechanisms as well as theoretical viewpoints have been proposed for the added benefit of this type of physical activity on executive functioning, cognition, and learning ( 19 , 28 , 29 , 35 , 36 ). However, with regards to classroom settings, Mavilidi et al ( 19 ) recently proposed an innovative conceptual model and instructional method emphasizing the importance of considering which aspects of physical activity may be the most relevant (or similar) to the learning material.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…As previously mentioned in the introduction, research examining the effects of cognitively engaging physical activity and the integration of academic learning material alongside physical activity has been gaining significant interest. Various physiological and cognitive mechanisms as well as theoretical viewpoints have been proposed for the added benefit of this type of physical activity on executive functioning, cognition, and learning ( 19 , 28 , 29 , 35 , 36 ). However, with regards to classroom settings, Mavilidi et al ( 19 ) recently proposed an innovative conceptual model and instructional method emphasizing the importance of considering which aspects of physical activity may be the most relevant (or similar) to the learning material.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…whereby they are asked to write down the answer to the problem and then perform that many repetitions of a certain physical activity (e.g., 25 jumping jacks). These academic physical activity breaks are not only practical as they can preserve teaching time while also reaping the acute benefits of physical activity, but the efficacy for these breaks is also supported through a combination of neuroscientific, developmental, and embodied cognition perspectives [for reviews see ( 19 , 28 , 29 )]. In short, these reviews and others ( 30 ) have proposed various intriguing reasons for why certain types of physical activity that require a high degree of cognitive engagement may be more beneficial than traditional forms of physical activity due to the unique connection between brain regions governing cognition (e.g., prefrontal cortex) and movement (e.g., cerebellum).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This is because children’s lower cognitive profile from a low SES seems to be affected by the lack of experiences (i.e., enriched environment) rather than permanent deficits in executive function development mechanisms [ 52 ]. Thereby, schools can apply diverse activities and experiences increasing physical fitness and cognitive skills, even simultaneously [ 53 , 54 ], which would reduce the detrimental impact of social inequalities and disadvantages on children and adolescents.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Every day more evidence of the positive impact of PA in cognitive development is found (Mandolesi et al, 2018 ; Aguirre-Loaiza et al, 2019a ; Doherty and Forés Miravalles, 2019 ; Erickson et al, 2019 ), which not only helps to the consolidation of knowledge on this area but also offers promising perspectives for multifactorial studies involving young students. Nevertheless, theoretical underpinnings have emphasized the mind–body dichotomy.…”
Section: Embodied Cognition and Physical Activitymentioning
confidence: 99%