1988
DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.14.4.646
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Perception of translational heading from optical flow.

Abstract: Radial patterns of optical flow produced by observer translation could be used to perceive the direction of self-movement during locomotion, and a number of formal analyses of such patterns have recently appeared. However, there is comparatively little empirical research on the perception of heading from optical flow, and what data there are indicate surprisingly poor performance, with heading errors on the order of 5 degrees-10 degrees. We examined heading judgments during translation parallel, perpendicular,… Show more

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Cited by 370 publications
(302 citation statements)
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References 77 publications
(171 reference statements)
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“…A series of experiments by Warren and his colleagues (Warren & Hannon, 1988Warren, Morris & Kalish, 1988) measured the accuracy with which observers can judge their heading direction in computer displays that simulate movement toward a planar surface or 3-D cloud of random dots. The first experiments simulated movement along a ground plane extending to a visible horizon.…”
Section: The Perception Of Observer Translationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A series of experiments by Warren and his colleagues (Warren & Hannon, 1988Warren, Morris & Kalish, 1988) measured the accuracy with which observers can judge their heading direction in computer displays that simulate movement toward a planar surface or 3-D cloud of random dots. The first experiments simulated movement along a ground plane extending to a visible horizon.…”
Section: The Perception Of Observer Translationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Under laboratory conditions, humans can accurately perceive the direction of translational heading with respect to a stationary object on the basis of simulated optic flow (Warren, Morris & Kalish, 1988). The accuracy of heading perception varies across the visual field and is most accurate when the focus of expansion is near the fovea and when the optic flow stimulus covers the central part of the visual field (Warren & Kurtz, 1992;Crowell & Banks, 1993;Atchley & Andersen, 1999).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A major visual stimulus for self-motion perception is optic flow or the temporal change in the pattern of light intensities at the moving point of observation (Gibson, 1966;Warren, Morris, & Kalish, 1988). Gradients ofoptical velocity contain several potential sources of information about observer motion through three-dimensional space (Gibson, Olum, & Rosenblatt, 1955).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%