2011
DOI: 10.1590/s1516-35982011001200036
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Abstract: -Sixty 18-month-old steers (20 Nellore, 20 F 1 Simmental × Nellore and 20 F 1 Angus × Nellore with average body weight of 265.6±6.4 kg; 325.3±4.7 kg and 324.6±6.0 kg, respectively) were used. The effects of feeding regime and genetic group on physical carcass composition, empty body composition, composition of the gain, as well as the pattern of tissue deposition were evaluated in this trial. The interaction between genetic group and feeding regime was not significant for any variable evaluated. Animals fed at… Show more

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Cited by 9 publications
(12 citation statements)
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References 13 publications
(12 reference statements)
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“…In fact, in a traditional feedlot production setting, subcutaneous depots are stored and formed prior to intramuscular fat depots (i.e., marbling; Vernon, 1981 ; Sainz and Hasting, 2000 ; Oliveira et al, 2011 ) and, therefore, it can be speculated that intramuscular fat depot differentiation would still occur in non-castrated Bos taurus indicus animals as they would achieve mature BW ( Valadares Filho et al, 2016 ). Likewise, Costa et al (2020) reported similar marbling scores in non-castrated Bos taurus indicus animals slaughtered at similar BW and offered high-concentrate diets with similar ether extract contents as used herein.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Hence, Harvey et al [ 85 ] speculated that heifers born to INR supplemented cows had a greater population of satellite cells undergoing differentiation at the time of sampling. Further, no treatment differences were detected in the LM for genes associated with adipogenic activities ( Table 5 ), however, the intramuscular region is typically the last depot for adipose tissue to be deposited in the growing animal [ 90 ] and the puberty process is more likely influenced by subcutaneous fat accretion [ 91 , 92 , 93 ]. Myogenic factors are downregulated as cattle mature and muscle fibers are fully developed [ 5 , 94 ]; therefore Harvey et al [ 85 ] noted that treatment differences noted in the LM for mRNA expression of myogenin and PAX7 may be indicative of accelerated physiological maturation in heifers born to AAC-supplemented cows [ 95 ].…”
Section: Supplementing Organic-complexed Trace Minerals Mid- To Late-gestationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Beef breeds show higher muscle and lower body fat content than dairy breeds ( Albertí et al, 2008 ; Pfuhl et al, 2007 ), while cows and heifers are reported to show higher fat content than steers and bulls ( Venkata Reddy et al, 2015 ). The body composition of an animal can be altered by changing the genetics through selective breeding or crossbreeding ( Bonilha et al, 2014 ; Oliveira et al, 2011 ), as well as by changing external influences as nutrition ( Keogh, Waters, Kelly, & Kenny, 2015 ; McCurdy, Horn, Wagner, Lancaster, & Krehbiel, 2010 ). However, the proportions of body tissues in cattle also change with increasing age and live weight of the animal until maturity is reached.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Nevertheless, most studies have evaluated the effect of supplementation during the growing phase on the finishing performance of cattle, considering the growing phase to be nutritionally uniform under non-tropical conditions (Drouillard and Kuhl, 1999;McCurdy et al, 2010;Neel et al, 2007). In addition, Bos indicus cattle are mainly used in tropical systems (Ferraz and Felício, 2010), and their growth pattern differs from Bos taurus (Oliveira et al, 2011).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%