2015
DOI: 10.1096/fj.15-274274
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Abstract: Obesity has more than doubled in children and tripled in adolescents in the past 30 yr. The association between metabolic disorders in offspring of obese mothers with diabetes has long been known; however, a growing body of research indicates that fathers play a significant role through presently unknown mechanisms. Recent observations have shown that changes in paternal diet may result in transgenerational inheritance of the insulin-resistant phenotype. Although diet-induced epigenetic reprogramming via pater… Show more

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Cited by 74 publications
(94 citation statements)
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References 55 publications
(72 reference statements)
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“…In the case of paternal exercise, the two current studies yield conflicting data with one reporting positive effects on cognitive function 61 but another suggesting this paternal activity results in offspring metabolic disruptions. 62 Clearly, additional studies are needed to sort out the potential offspring DOHaD outcomes due to paternal exercise and whether there can be transgenerational transmission due to epigenetic changes in the spermatozoa. 62 While fathers cannot provide direct nourishment to the young after birth, additional attention should be paid to whether a healthy diet of the father, and the mother, before conception can lead to long-term beneficial offspring consequences.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…In the case of paternal exercise, the two current studies yield conflicting data with one reporting positive effects on cognitive function 61 but another suggesting this paternal activity results in offspring metabolic disruptions. 62 Clearly, additional studies are needed to sort out the potential offspring DOHaD outcomes due to paternal exercise and whether there can be transgenerational transmission due to epigenetic changes in the spermatozoa. 62 While fathers cannot provide direct nourishment to the young after birth, additional attention should be paid to whether a healthy diet of the father, and the mother, before conception can lead to long-term beneficial offspring consequences.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…62 Clearly, additional studies are needed to sort out the potential offspring DOHaD outcomes due to paternal exercise and whether there can be transgenerational transmission due to epigenetic changes in the spermatozoa. 62 While fathers cannot provide direct nourishment to the young after birth, additional attention should be paid to whether a healthy diet of the father, and the mother, before conception can lead to long-term beneficial offspring consequences. It is increasingly becoming apparent that sub-optimal paternal diets, those high in fat or protein restricted, can result in negative offspring sequelae, [14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21][146][147][148][149] but the impacts of a healthy diet have been largely ignored.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Paternally-induced transgenerational inheritance for obesity and metabolic disorders has also been confirmed in mammals. Changes in paternal diet and fitness have been shown to initiate environmental reprogramming and promote obesity susceptibility and phenotype variation in mice and humans (Carone et al, 2010;Murashov et al, 2015;Soubry, 2015), providing more insights into the mechanisms behind intergenerational reprogramming and phenotypic variations for obesity and metabolic disorders.…”
Section: Transgenerational Impact Of Nutrition On Fetal and Adult Heamentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Evidence from numerous animal studies suggests that regular exercise training by either the mother or the father confers a health benefit on the first generation [56][57][58][59] . Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanism by which exercise effects various metabolic phenotypes over several generations.…”
Section: Exercise and Epigenetic Inheritancementioning
confidence: 99%