2018
DOI: 10.1097/scs.0000000000004406
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Abstract: Open craniosynostosis repair is associated with high levels of pain and low utilization of nonopioid analgesics. Strategies to improve pain, decrease emesis and LOS include implementation of multimodal analgesia period and avoidance of enteral medications in the first 24 hours after surgery.

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Cited by 11 publications
(8 citation statements)
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“…We conducted this systematic review using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, in accordance with Cochrane review methods [ 19 , 20 ]. The published literature was searched on MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar from inception until May 2022 without specifying a timeframe.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…We conducted this systematic review using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, in accordance with Cochrane review methods [ 19 , 20 ]. The published literature was searched on MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar from inception until May 2022 without specifying a timeframe.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…2 Surgery is usually indicated in the first year of life to prevent intracranial hypertension and improve the appearance of the shape of the head. 3 Previous studies have evaluated the assessment of pain and treatment in the pediatric population following surgery. [1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10] Studies have demonstrated that pain is moderate to severe following cranial vault surgery, and nonopioid analgesics are used infrequently.…”
Section: Ementioning
confidence: 99%
“…3 Previous studies have evaluated the assessment of pain and treatment in the pediatric population following surgery. [1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10] Studies have demonstrated that pain is moderate to severe following cranial vault surgery, and nonopioid analgesics are used infrequently. 3 Another study performed a literature review and concluded that there are few studies evaluating pain following cranial vault surgery and its management.…”
Section: Ementioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Ketorolac is an NSAID with an analgesic efficacy and safety similar to commonly used opioids and has been validated in cardiac, abdominal, orthopedic, urologic, neurologic, and plastic surgical procedures involving adult and pediatric populations (Watcha et al, 1992; Marín-Bertolín et al, 1997; Lieh-Lai et al, 1999; Beiter et al, 2001; Shin et al, 2001; Dsida et al, 2002; Forrest et al, 2002; Gupta et al, 2004; Cepeda et al, 2005; Lynn et al, 2007; Torgerson et al, 2008; Yassen & Sayed, 2012; Carr et al, 2018; Howard et al, 2018; Kattail et al, 2018). The analgesic effect is provided by the blockade of the cyclooxygenase (COX) system, which decreases prostaglandin synthesis.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%