2007
DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2007.10.059
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Optic Flow Drives Human Visuo-Locomotor Adaptation

Abstract: Two strategies can guide walking to a stationary goal: (1) the optic-flow strategy, in which one aligns the direction of locomotion or "heading" specified by optic flow with the visual goal; and (2) the egocentric-direction strategy, in which one aligns the locomotor axis with the perceived egocentric direction of the goal and in which error results in optical target drift. Optic flow appears to dominate steering control in richly structured visual environments, whereas the egocentric- direction strategy preva… Show more

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Cited by 93 publications
(81 citation statements)
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“…Our results are consistent with these previous findings but add significant insight by identifying the underlying processes that produce these behaviors, namely, a fast gait selection mechanism that responds to the altered visual stimuli and a slower process that gradually returns subjects back to steady state over several minutes. Gait speed selection is then similar to the control of heading in that visual flow rate is used rapidly for online correction (Bruggeman et al 2007). The outcome of this study also provides functional knowledge for using virtual reality to enhance rehabilitative gait training (Lamontagne et al 2007) and suggests that reducing the visually perceived walking speed through a multiplicative gain will have a significant, albeit temporary, effect on increasing walking speed during a training session.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 76%
“…Our results are consistent with these previous findings but add significant insight by identifying the underlying processes that produce these behaviors, namely, a fast gait selection mechanism that responds to the altered visual stimuli and a slower process that gradually returns subjects back to steady state over several minutes. Gait speed selection is then similar to the control of heading in that visual flow rate is used rapidly for online correction (Bruggeman et al 2007). The outcome of this study also provides functional knowledge for using virtual reality to enhance rehabilitative gait training (Lamontagne et al 2007) and suggests that reducing the visually perceived walking speed through a multiplicative gain will have a significant, albeit temporary, effect on increasing walking speed during a training session.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 76%
“…For example, visual feedback is sufficient to recalibrate visually guided throwing (Martin et al, 1996), while optic flow can recalibrate self-motion toward a target (Bruggeman et al, 2007). Prisms that alter the relationship between convergence and distance cause perceptual aftereffects (e.g., , primarily via changes in oculomotor muscle tone (Ebenholtz and Wolfson, 1975).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Visually guided locomotion has received considerable attention in the past [10,27,40,22,39,6], and two main strategies to move towards a goal have been identified. The first one, proposed by Gibson [10], leverages the optical flow created by the apparent motion of each point composing the sequence of images perceived by the walker during his motion [17].…”
Section: Goal-directed Locomotionmentioning
confidence: 99%