2017
DOI: 10.21475/ajcs.17.11.12.pne662
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Non-destructive estimation of leaf area in passion fruit (Passiflora edulis L.)

Abstract: The yellow passion fruit is the most commonly cultivated species of the genus Passiflora in commercial plantations in Brazil. Obtaining accurate and easy to perform measurements for determination of leaf area in passion fruit is crucial to understand the interaction between the plant and the environment. The objective of this study was to develop reliable mathematical equations to directly estimate leaf area in passion fruit using linear measurements. Passion fruit leaves may exhibit varying morphology across … Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1
1

Citation Types

0
3
0

Year Published

2019
2019
2024
2024

Publication Types

Select...
7

Relationship

0
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 7 publications
(3 citation statements)
references
References 16 publications
(30 reference statements)
0
3
0
Order By: Relevance
“…To determine whether larger leaves predict gregarious larvae, we recorded the mature leaf size of each Passifloraceae in our dataset, given by Ulmar and MacDougal as separate ranges (minimum and maximum) of leaf length and width (both cm). Here, we first calculated the median value of these ranges, then multiplied one median by the other to gain an estimate of the median leaf surface area, assuming an idealised leaf shape, which was used as a final value for what we term ‘leaf size’ (de Luna Souto et al., 2017). We acknowledge that, given the leaf shape diversity in Passilfora , the leaf surface area calculated here is likely a crude estimate of overall leaf tissue available to larvae.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…To determine whether larger leaves predict gregarious larvae, we recorded the mature leaf size of each Passifloraceae in our dataset, given by Ulmar and MacDougal as separate ranges (minimum and maximum) of leaf length and width (both cm). Here, we first calculated the median value of these ranges, then multiplied one median by the other to gain an estimate of the median leaf surface area, assuming an idealised leaf shape, which was used as a final value for what we term ‘leaf size’ (de Luna Souto et al., 2017). We acknowledge that, given the leaf shape diversity in Passilfora , the leaf surface area calculated here is likely a crude estimate of overall leaf tissue available to larvae.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Either fresh or dry (after 48 h at 65 • C) weight of roots was determined. For these evaluations, five individual plants after GlcCer or buffer pulverization, or plants without any treatment, were analyzed, following the non-destructive method described by Souto et al (2017) [21]. Fresh and dry weights were determined using the accurate electronic scale JA3003N, from Bioprecisa Co, Curitiba, PR, Brazil.…”
Section: Plant Developmental Parameter Evaluationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…So far, several models and regression equations have been proposed, either to be applied at the leaf [11,13] or shoot level [14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23]. Until now, models and regression equations for fruit trees cover several species, like for instance, apricot [24], avocado [25], banana [26], blackberry [25], cacao [27], chestnut [28], citrus [29], grapevine [14,15,20,25,30,31,32,33], guava [34], hazelnut [18], kiwifruit [25,35], lotus plum [25], mango [36], medlar [37], passion fruit [38], peach [39], persian walnut [40], persimmon [25,41], pistachio [42], rabbiteye blueberry [43], red currant [25], small fruits [44], red raspberry [25], sour orange [45], strawberry [46,47], pecan [48], sweet cherry [49,50], and white mulberry [51]. In this context, it seems interesting to also analyse the loquat ( Eriobotrya japonica Lindl), a fruit tree species belonging to the Rosaceae family.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%