2010
DOI: 10.1590/s1679-62252010005000014 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Several Pterygoplichthys species, members of the Neotropical catfish family Loricariidae, have been widely introduced outside their native ranges. In this paper, I present observations on the diel activity pattern of non-native Pterygoplichthys, tentatively identified as P. disjunctivus, with respect to their attachment and grazing on endangered Florida manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris. The study was conducted in December 2009 at Volusia Blue Spring, an artesianal spring system in the St. Johns River b… Show more

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“…Similar to observations reported for loricariids in their native ranges [34] and introduced populations of Pterygoplichthys in Florida [35], Pterygoplichthys in the Chacamax River were nocturnally active (Figure 2). Gut content mass was greater during evening hours, indicating loricariids are primarily active and feeding at night in the study site (Figure 3D).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
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“…Similar to observations reported for loricariids in their native ranges [34] and introduced populations of Pterygoplichthys in Florida [35], Pterygoplichthys in the Chacamax River were nocturnally active (Figure 2). Gut content mass was greater during evening hours, indicating loricariids are primarily active and feeding at night in the study site (Figure 3D).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
“…When coupled with work demonstrating non-native loricariids are: competing with native species for food resources [42], [43], altering the structure of aquatic and riparian ecosystems [44], [45], and negatively affecting populations of threatened and endangered species [35], [46]; the results from this study indicate high-densities of invading loricariids threaten the structure and function of ecosystems. Moreover, the results from this investigation provide additional evidence [47] that aggregations of non-native organisms have the potential to alter nutrient dynamics and generate biogeochemical hotspots.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Polyunsaturated FA composition and d 13 C signatures of these fish resemble those of detritivores. The pectoral spines and osseous plates of adult armoured catfish, P. multiradiatus, makes predation by C. monoculus unlikely (Nico, 2010), suggesting a stronger predation of C. monoculus on S. insignis. Assuming a d 15 N trophic enrichment factor of 2.8& for Neotropical fish (Jepsen & Winemiller, 2007), P. multiradiatus and S. insignis, and other non-sampled species with similar isotopic signatures, may thus be considered as preferred prey for both piscivores.…”
Section: Food Source Utilisationmentioning
“…Assuming a d 15 N trophic enrichment factor of 2.8& for Neotropical fish (Jepsen & Winemiller, 2007), P. multiradiatus and S. insignis, and other non-sampled species with similar isotopic signatures, may thus be considered as preferred prey for both piscivores. The pectoral spines and osseous plates of adult armoured catfish, P. multiradiatus, makes predation by C. monoculus unlikely (Nico, 2010), suggesting a stronger predation of C. monoculus on S. insignis. However, while C. monoculus is described as an exclusive piscivore (Goulding, 1980), P. nattereri may also feed on macrophytes, crabs and insects (Sazima & Machado, 1990;Pouilly et al, 2003).…”
Section: Food Source Utilisationmentioning
“…Presence in captures of the Characiformes and Siluriformes orders reveal a marked contrast. This contrast may be caused by the capture method that only considered diurnal cycles when some species are more active during nocturnal periods (Arrington & Winemiller, 2003;Pelicice et al, 2005;Nico 2010). The behavior in the daily activities of fish varies among the different orders.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning