2020
DOI: 10.1097/tp.0000000000003171
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Background. Facial vascularized composite allotransplantation (fVCA) presents an established approach to restore form and function of patients with catastrophic facial defects. Skin is one of the target tissues of the rejection process, and due to its easy accessibility has become the gold standard in the diagnosis of rejection. Mucosal rejection frequently occurs; however, the added value of mucosal rejection assessment for patient management is unknown. Methods. … Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
2
1

Citation Types

0
32
2

Year Published

2020
2020
2023
2023

Publication Types

Select...
6
1

Relationship

3
4

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 29 publications
(34 citation statements)
references
References 33 publications
0
32
2
Order By: Relevance
“…Although biopsy results were unavailable for most mucosal lesions, published data suggest a collinearity between high-grade skin and mucosa Banff grades. 3 The spectrum of mucosa Banff grades narrows with an increase in skin Banff grade and skin rejection. 3 On histology, skin Banff > grade II was reported to be almost exclusively accompanied by mucosal rejection of equal or higher grade.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Although biopsy results were unavailable for most mucosal lesions, published data suggest a collinearity between high-grade skin and mucosa Banff grades. 3 The spectrum of mucosa Banff grades narrows with an increase in skin Banff grade and skin rejection. 3 On histology, skin Banff > grade II was reported to be almost exclusively accompanied by mucosal rejection of equal or higher grade.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…1 , 2 Although an fVCA contains different tissue types, skin is thought to be the most immunogenic and susceptible part of the allograft, and thus, the tissue relied on for routine monitoring of face transplant rejection. 3 Most of our knowledge and investigations on changes in fVCAs are therefore centered around the skin portion of the allograft. Little is known about changes that occur in other tissues.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A recent study shows that higher grade skin rejection (≥BANFF II) is almost always accompanied by equal or more prominent histological signs of rejection on mucosal biopsy. 4 Therefore, biopsy-proven grade II (sub)-clinical skin rejections in POMs 57, 59, 70, and 74 are likely a surrogate of rejection inside the mucocutaneous tissue of the nasal vestibule (Fig. 1 ) ( see figure, Supplemental Digital Content 1 , which displays normal nasal appearance in POM 12.…”
Section: Discussion and Viewpointmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although mucosal rejection is poorly understood, we hypothesize that rejection of the mucosal lining may have contributed to the severity of these findings and to the changes illustrated in Figure 1 . 4 …”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[18][19][20] However, unique to facial transplantation, mucosa appears to be one of the primary targets of acute rejection, and is always present in higher-grade skin rejection samples. 21 Additionally, when VCA skin pathology specimens are reported, there is inherent intra-and inter-observer error, as inflammation seen is not specific to rejection. 22 This issue is not unique to VCA, with borderline changes being a challenge to differentiate from true acute rejection, necessitating clinical correlation.…”
Section: The Current Landscape Of Biomarker Discovery In Vcamentioning
confidence: 99%