2017
DOI: 10.1111/ahe.12292
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Morphological Studies of the Tongue of the Egyptian Water Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis ) and Their Lingual Papillae Adaptation for Its Feeding Habits

Abstract: This work was conducted to describe the morphological characters of the tongue of Egyptian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). The lingual root and the dorsal middle region of apex and body in addition to the dorsal and ventral surface of lingual tip were devoided from any fungiform papillae. The lingual tip contains conical papillae only. The ventral surface of lingual apex was divided into two portions by the U-shaped fungiform line into papillary and non-papillary region. Histological investigation on the ling… Show more

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Cited by 29 publications
(84 citation statements)
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References 46 publications
(122 reference statements)
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“…The second method for feeding, but it is little used when compared to the goose is the grazing methods. The current work agree with that reported by El-Bakary and Abumandour (2017) and…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 94%
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“…The second method for feeding, but it is little used when compared to the goose is the grazing methods. The current work agree with that reported by El-Bakary and Abumandour (2017) and…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 94%
“…The second method for feeding, but it is little used when compared to the goose is the grazing methods. The current work agree with that reported by El‐Bakary and Abumandour () and Skieresz‐Szewczyk and Jackowiak () that the Anatidae family used the conical papillae on the lateral surface of the lingual body to perform the grazing action in the feeding process to grab the grass leaves, which then hold by the lingual prominence with the palate as reported in the herbivorous animals (El‐Bakary & Abumandour, ). The other structure linked to the grassing behaviors of the wild duck Anatidae family is the presence of the external lamella on the upper beak and internal lamellae on the lower beak that acting as a scissors.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 91%
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